Spatial Cognition

Geographic Environments

  • Robert Lloyd

Part of the The GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 39)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxiii
  2. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 1-24
  3. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 44-69
  4. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 70-92
  5. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 93-118
  6. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 119-150
  7. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 151-184
  8. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 185-215
  9. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 216-255
  10. Robert Lloyd
    Pages 256-264
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 265-287

About this book

Introduction

10.2 Summary of Ideas ..................................................... 256 10.2.1 Spatial Behavior As Rules For Decision Making ................................... 258 10.2.2. Cognitive Mapping ......................................................................... 258 10.2.3. Storing Information ................................................. " ...................... 260 10.2.4. Searching ..................................................................................... 260 10.2.5. Learning ........................................................................................ 261 10.2.6. Judging Similarity .......................................................................... 261 10.2.7 Neural Geographic Information Science (NGIS) .................................... 262 REFERENCES ............................................... 265 INDEX ........................ .............. 279 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ................................... 287 x LIST OF TABLES Table 8.1: The types of similarity comparisons created for the experiment to determine the effect ofx as a first or second common or distinctive feature (Lloyd, Rostkowska-Covington, and Steinke 1996). Table 9.1: Data used to compute the gravity model using regression and a neural network. Data for all variables are scaled so that the highest value equals 0.9 and the lowest value equals 0.1. Table 9.2: Class means for 11 socio-economic and life-cycle variables for the Black, Integrated, and White classes. Table 9.3: Weights for neuron at row 5 and column 1 that learned the blue horizontal rectangle map symbol. LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1.1: Spatial cognition is a research area of interest for both geography and psychology. Both disciplines are interested in fundamental ideas related to encoding processes, internal representations, and decoding processes. Figure 1.2: The place names on this map of New Orleans depict the propositions used for navigation by local residents. A similar map appeared in the June 30, 1991, edition of The Times-Picayune.

Keywords

classification coding cognition cognitive science fuzzy knowledge learning memory networks neural networks pattern recognition perception

Authors and affiliations

  • Robert Lloyd
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geography and the Center of Excellence in Geographic EducationUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-3044-0
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1997
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-90-481-4783-0
  • Online ISBN 978-94-017-3044-0
  • Series Print ISSN 0924-5499
  • About this book