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Rule and Order Dutch Planning Doctrine in the Twentieth Century

  • Andreas Faludi
  • Arnold Van Der Valk

Part of the The GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 28)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xviii
  2. Background

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-6
    2. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 7-25
    3. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 26-44
  3. The Unfolding of Planning

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 45-50
    2. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 51-67
    3. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 68-80
  4. Reconstruction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 81-87
    2. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 88-100
    3. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 101-112
  5. The Heyday

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 113-121
    2. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 122-138
    3. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 139-151
    4. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 152-162
    5. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 163-175
  6. Crisis and Response

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 176-184
    2. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 185-201
    3. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 202-216
    4. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 217-231
  7. Conclusions

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 232-232
    2. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 233-245
    3. Andreas Faludi, Arnold Van Der Valk
      Pages 246-262
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 263-316

About this book

Introduction

This book is about an art in which the Netherlands excels: strategic planning. Foreign observers will need little convincing of the merits of Dutch planning. They will want to know whether routine explanations (small country, industrious, disciplined people hardened by the perennial fight against the sea) hold any water, and they will want to know where to look for the bag of tricks of Dutch planners. Dutch readers need to be convinced first that planning in the Netherlands is indeed effective before contemplating how this has come about. Our message for both is that, to the extent that Dutch planners do live in what others are inclined to see as a planners' paradise, it is a paradise carefully constructed and maintained by the planners themselves. This smacks of Bernard Shaw describing a profession as a conspiracy against laity. However, all knowledge and all technologies are 'socially constructed', meaning that they are the products of people or groups pursuing often conflicting aims and coming to arrangements about what is to pass as 'true' and 'good'. So this takes away the odium of Dutch planners having their own agenda. Positioning ourselves We are in the business of interpreting Dutch planning, and at the same time committed to improving it. This makes us part of the situation which we describe. This situation is characterized by the existence of two divergent traditions, urban design and the social-science discipline called 'planologie'.

Keywords

Policy geography history research

Authors and affiliations

  • Andreas Faludi
    • 1
  • Arnold Van Der Valk
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Planning and DemographyUniversity of AmsterdamThe Netherlands

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-2927-7
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1994
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-90-481-4347-4
  • Online ISBN 978-94-017-2927-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0924-5499
  • Buy this book on publisher's site