Mass Loss from Red Giants

Proceedings of a Conference held at the University of California at Los Angeles, U.S.A., June 20–21, 1984

  • Mark Morris
  • Ben Zuckerman
Conference proceedings

Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 117)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Leo Goldberg
    Pages 21-27
  3. A. K. Dupree, L. Hartmann, G. H. Smith, E. H. Avrett
    Pages 29-30
  4. Jacques M. Beckers
    Pages 57-61
  5. R. Sahai, P. G. Wannier
    Pages 81-82
  6. Kenneth H. Hinkle
    Pages 85-86
  7. W. Schutte, A. G. G. M. Tielens
    Pages 87-93
  8. Steven Beckwith
    Pages 95-113
  9. Michael L. Cobb, John D. Fix
    Pages 115-116
  10. R. Sahai, Alwyn Wootten, R. E. S. Clegg
    Pages 151-152

About these proceedings

Introduction

Red giant and supergiant stars have long been favorites of professional 6 and amateur astronomers. These enormous stars emit up to 10 times more energy than the Sun and, so, are easy to study. Some of them, specifically the pulsating long-period variables, significantly change their size, brightness, and color within about a year, a time scale of interest to a single human being. Some aspects of the study of red giant stars are similar to the study of pre-main-sequence stars. For example, optical astronomy gives us a tantalizing glimpse of star forming regions but to really investi­ gate young stars and protostars requires infrared and radio astronomy. The same is true of post-main-sequence stars that are losing mass. Optical astronomers can measure the atomic component of winds from red giant stars that are undergoing mass loss at modest rates 6 (M $ 10- M9/yr.). But to see dust grains and molecules properly, 5 especially in stars with truly large mass loss rates, ~ 10- M9/yr, one requires IR and radio astronomy. As this stage of copious mass loss only lasts for ~105 years one might be tempted to ask, "who cares?".

Keywords

LOPES Variation astronomy gravity interferometry optical interferometry photometry planet radio astronomy spectroscopy star stars stellar sun telescope

Editors and affiliations

  • Mark Morris
    • 1
  • Ben Zuckerman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AstronomyUCLALos AngelesUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-5428-1
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1985
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-8896-1
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-5428-1
  • Series Print ISSN 0067-0057
  • About this book