Tables of Spectral Data for Structure Determination of Organic Compounds

  • Ernö Pretsch
  • Thomas Clerc
  • Joseph Seibl
  • Wilhelm Simon

Part of the Chemical Laboratory Practice book series (CHEMICAL LABORA)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XIII
  2. Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 1-3
  3. Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 4-4
  4. Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 5-54
  5. Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 55-107
  6. Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 156-237
  7. IR
    Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 238-305
  8. MS
    Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 306-355
  9. Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 357-387
  10. Ernö Pretsch, Thomas Clerc, Joseph Seibl, Wilhelm Simon
    Pages 389-398
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 399-416

About this book

Introduction

Although numerical data are, in principle, universal, the compilations presented in this book are extensively annotated and interleaved with text. This translation of the second German edition has been prepared to facilitate the use of this work, with all its valuable detail, by the large community of English-speaking scientists. Translation has also provided an opportunity to correct and revise the text, and to update the nomenclature. Fortunately, spectroscopic data and their relationship with structure do not change much with time so one can predict that this book will, for a long period of time, continue to be very useful to organic chemists involved in the identification of organic compounds or the elucidation of their structure. Klaus Biemann Cambridge, MA, April 1983 Preface to the First German Edition Making use of the information provided by various spectroscopic tech­ niques has become a ·matter of routine for the analytically oriented organic chemist. Those who have graduated recently received extensive training in these techniques as part of the curriculum while their older colleagues learned to use these methods by necessity. One can, therefore, assume that chemists are well versed in the proper choice of the methods suitable for the solution of a particular problem and to translate the experimental data into structural information.

Keywords

Analysis Chemische Analyse Chemische Struktur Organische Verbindung Spectroscopy Spektroskopie Spektrum Structure UV/VIS organic compounds

Authors and affiliations

  • Ernö Pretsch
    • 1
  • Thomas Clerc
    • 2
  • Joseph Seibl
    • 1
  • Wilhelm Simon
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratorium für Organische ChemieEidgenössische Technische HochschuleZürichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Pharmazeutisches Institut der UniversitätBernSwitzerland

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-10207-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-51202-8
  • Online ISBN 978-3-662-10207-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0172-4967
  • About this book