Ecological Systems of the Geobiosphere

2 Tropical and Subtropical Zonobiomes

  • Heinrich Walter
  • Siegmar-W. Breckle

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages N2-XIV
  2. Zonobiome I: Equatorial ZB with Diurnal Climate (Perhumid Zonobiome)

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-2
    2. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 3-14
    3. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 14-19
    4. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 19-54
    5. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 54-57
    6. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 57-58
    7. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 58-66
    8. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 66-67
    9. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 68-99
    10. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 99-104
    11. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 104-107
  3. Zonobiome II: Tropical ZB with Summer Rainfall (Humid-Arid Climate)

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 109-110
    2. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 111-112
    3. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 112-117
    4. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 117-147
    5. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 147-150
    6. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 150-152
    7. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 152-161
    8. Heinrich Walter, Siegmar-W. Breckle
      Pages 161-161

About this book

Introduction

In Volume 1 of this four-volume series, ecological problems of a general nature were discussed from a global point of view. Familiarity with this is essential for a full understanding of the more specialized treatment in this and subsequent volumes, for no similar approach is to be found in other ecological handbooks for beginners. This present volume deals in detail with the special ecological relation­ ships of the tropical and subtropical zonobiomes I to III. Most ecologists proceed from the basis of their experience in the temperate zones of the northern hemisphere. As a result, many ecological writings show a certain one-sidedness and there is a danger that generalizations made will not be broadly applicable. To avoid this, particular emphasis is laid, in this vol­ urne, on the special ecological features and the characteristics of the trop­ ical and subtropical regions. More specifically, we deal not only with the relationship of the euclimatope to zonal soils and zonal vegetation, but also pay attention to azonal conditions shown in pedobiomes and in the altitudinal belts of mountains, the orobiomes. In this and the subsequent volumes the same simple scheme is followed in treating each zonobiome: 1. climate; 2. soils; 3. producers; 4. consum­ ers; 5. decomposers; 6. ecosystems; 7. sub division into biomes; 8. oro­ biomes; 9. pedobiomes and 10. zonoecotones. Where it has appeared expedient, however, we have occasionally deviated from this scheme (see Deserts D, F, G and H).

Keywords

Orobiom Pedobiome Zonobiom desert ecosystem ecotone lake soil vegetation

Authors and affiliations

  • Heinrich Walter
    • 1
  • Siegmar-W. Breckle
    • 2
  1. 1.Universität HohenheimStuttgart 70Germany
  2. 2.Universität BielefeldBielefeld 1Germany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-06812-0
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-662-06814-4
  • Online ISBN 978-3-662-06812-0
  • About this book