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Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

A Multitype Branching Process Model

  • Catherine A. Macken
  • Alan S. Perelson

Part of the Lecture Notes in Biomathematics book series (LNBM, volume 76)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-VIII
  2. Catherine A. Macken, Alan S. Perelson
    Pages 1-13
  3. Catherine A. Macken, Alan S. Perelson
    Pages 14-26
  4. Catherine A. Macken, Alan S. Perelson
    Pages 27-40
  5. Catherine A. Macken, Alan S. Perelson
    Pages 41-46
  6. Catherine A. Macken, Alan S. Perelson
    Pages 47-54
  7. Catherine A. Macken, Alan S. Perelson
    Pages 55-59
  8. Catherine A. Macken, Alan S. Perelson
    Pages 60-83
  9. Catherine A. Macken, Alan S. Perelson
    Pages 84-93
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 94-116

About this book

Introduction

The body contains many cellular systems that require the continuous production of new, fully functional, differentiated cells to replace cells lacking or having limited self-renewal capabilities that die or are damaged during the lifetime of an individual. Such systems include the epidermis, the epithelial lining of the gut, and the blood. For example, erythrocytes (red blood cells) lack nuclei and thus are incapable of self-replication. They have a life span in the circulation of about 120 days. Mature granulocytes, which also lack proliferative capacity, have a much shorter life span - typically 12 hours, though this may be reduced to only two or three hours in times of serious tissue infection. Perhaps a more familiar example is the outermost layer of the skin. This layer is composed of fully mature, dead epidermal cells that must be replaced by the descendants of stem cells lodged in lower layers of the epidermis (cf. Alberts et al. , 1983). In total, to supply the normal steady-state demands of cells, an average human must produce approximately 3. 7 x 1011 cells a day throughout life (Dexter and Spooncer, 1987). Common to each of these cellular systems is a primitive (undifferentiated) stem cell which replenishes cells through the production of offspring, some of which proliferate and gradually differentiate until mature, fully functional cells are produced.

Keywords

mathematics probability stochastic process

Authors and affiliations

  • Catherine A. Macken
    • 1
  • Alan S. Perelson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mathematics and StatisticsUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Theoretical DivisionLos Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-93396-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-50183-1
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-93396-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0341-633X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site