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Life Under Extreme Conditions

Biochemical Adaptation

  • Guido di Prisco

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XI
  2. R. D’Avino, C. Caruso, L. Camardella, M. E. Schininà, B. Rutigliano, M. Romano et al.
    Pages 15-33
  3. H. W. Detrich III
    Pages 35-49
  4. B. Giardina, S. G. Condò, A. Bardgard, O. Brix
    Pages 51-60
  5. M. De Rosa, A. Trincone, B. Nicolaus, A. Gambacorta
    Pages 61-87
  6. M. Rossi, M. V. Cubellis, R. Rella, F. Pisani, M. Moracci, R. Nucci et al.
    Pages 115-123
  7. G. Zaccai, H. Eisenberg
    Pages 125-137
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 139-144

About these proceedings

Introduction

In their very first lecture biochemists learn that biomolecules, namely nucleic acids, proteins and lipids, are extremely temperature sensitive and will denature and lose their function easily. Then how do Archaebacteria survive in hot springs or Antarctic fishes which live in ice-cold water? The way nature engineered subcellular structures, lipid membranes or proteins to meet the biochemical requirements of extreme conditions - like extreme temperature or salt concentrations - is described in Life Under Extreme Conditions.

Keywords

Lipid adaptation antarctica bacteria biomolecule environment enzyme enzymes membrane nucleic acid protein protein folding proteins stability temperature

Editors and affiliations

  • Guido di Prisco
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Protein Biochemistry and Enzymology (IBPE)Italian National Research CouncilNaplesItaly

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-76056-3
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-76058-7
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-76056-3
  • Buy this book on publisher's site