Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Nervous System

  • Francesco Clementi
  • Cecilia Gotti
  • Emanuele Sher

Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 25)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XVII
  2. Biochemical and Pharmacological Characterization of Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors

    1. V. A. Chiappinelli, S. E. Dryer, E. M. Sorenspn, K. M. Wolf, G. A. Grant, S.-J. Chen et al.
      Pages 15-29
    2. S. Wonnacott, J. Irons, G. G. Lunt, C. M. Rapier, E. X. Albuquerque
      Pages 41-60
    3. Irm Hermans-Borgmeyer, Erich Sawruk, Patrick Schloß, Eckart D. Gundelfinger, Heinrich Betz
      Pages 77-88
    4. C. Gotti, E. Sher, D. Fornasari, B. Chini, A. Esparis Ogando, F. Clementi
      Pages 89-104
    5. Bianca M. Conti-Tronconi, Anna Kokla, Alfred Maelicke, Robert Milius, Michael A. Raftery, Sandra R. Spencer et al.
      Pages 119-136
    6. René de la Garza, Barry J. Hoffer, Robert Freedman
      Pages 137-141
    7. Abdu Adem, Per-Göran Gillberg, Sukhwinder S. Jossan, Vicki Sara, Agneta Nordberg
      Pages 143-147
  3. Molecular Biology of AChR

    1. Jon Lindstrom, Paul Whiting, Ralf Schoepfer, Michael Luther, Brett Casey
      Pages 159-172
    2. Steve Heinemann, Jim Boulter, Evan Deneris, John Connolly, Paul Gardner, Etsuko Wada et al.
      Pages 173-191
    3. Patrick Nef, Carole Oneyser, Christine Alliod, Sabine Couturier, Marc Ballivet
      Pages 193-198
  4. Invertebrate AChR

About these proceedings

Introduction

The acetylcholine nicotinic receptor is an ionic channel whose aperture is directly controlled by acetylcholine. It is a key molecule in the chemical communication between nerve cells and between nerve cell and muscle. The structure and function of muscular nicotinic receptors have been unraveled in recent years and its beauty and mysteries were reviewed in the Santorini NATO ARW organized by Dr. Maelicke in 1986. The neat, linear structure of this molecule and its conservation throughout evolution, from bacteria to humans, have led to the suggestion that it has reached the optimal structure for performing its function. But when scientists began to look at the nicotinic receptor in the nervous system, they found several surprises. From the beginning, pharmacological and physiological experiments, have made it clear that the functional characteristics of neuronal nicotinic receptors are substantially different from those of muscle receptors. Furthermore, recent sophisticated techniques such as patch clamp and gene cloning have revealed that the nicotinic receptor in the nervous system is not a single molecule but (although there are some important exceptions) a large family of similar molecules, which have in common the property of binding nicotinic agonists or antagonists. Over the last few years, the physiological implications of nicotinic receptors have been reevaluated on the basis of more precise behavioural and pharmacological techniques. Moreover, the involvement of nicotinic receptors in degenerative pathologies of the eNS, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, has also been discovered very recently.

Keywords

Alzheimer Nervous System Parkinson alzheimer's disease bacteria cell evolution gene muscle receptor research

Editors and affiliations

  • Francesco Clementi
    • 1
  • Cecilia Gotti
    • 1
  • Emanuele Sher
    • 1
  1. 1.CNR Center of Cytopharmacology, Department of Medical PharmacologyUniversity of MilanoMilanoItaly

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-74167-8
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-74169-2
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-74167-8
  • About this book