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Yeast Genetics

A Manual of Methods

  • John F. T. Spencer
  • Dorothy M. Spencer
  • I. J. Bruce

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-VII
  2. Introduction

    1. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 1-2
  3. “Classical” Yeast Genetics

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 3-4
    2. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 4-8
    3. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 8-15
    4. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 16-25
    5. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 25-26
    6. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 26-30
    7. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 30-58
    8. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 58-64
    9. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 64-69
  4. Methods Using Direct Manipulation of DNA and RNA

    1. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 71-84
    2. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 85-88
    3. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 88-91
    4. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 91-93
    5. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 93-94
    6. John F. T. Spencer, Dorothy M. Spencer, I. J. Bruce
      Pages 94-97
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 99-104

About this book

Introduction

The manual consists of two main sections. The first includes the essential, sometimes laborious, procedures for handling yeasts, for inducing mating and isolation of hybrids, for inducing sporulation and isolation of single-spore clones, with some details of tetrad analysis, and including techniques and ancillary equipment for use of the micromanipulator. There are also proce­ dures for induction of mutants by physical and chemical agents, and for iso­ lation of particular types of mutants, such as to temperature sensitivity, for increased frequency of mutations, for mutations in the mitochondrial genome, both to the petite colonie form and to resistance to antibiotics, for mutations in that part of the yeast genome controlling the glycolytic cycle, and numerous others. Mapping of mutations is discussed briefly, though this aspect of yeast genetics is probably one which should not be undertaken until the investigator has gained a certain amount of experience in the field. How­ ever, as is pointed out in the pertinent part of the manual, the task of mapping has been tremendouslysimplified by the availability from the Yeast Genetics Stock Center at the University of California at Berkeley of a set of auxo­ trophic strains designed to permit mapping of most unknown genes with a minimum number of crosses and tetrad analyses. The first section concludes with the description of methods for hybridization of yeasts by protoplast fusion, which has been described as the poor man's system for genetic engineering.

Keywords

DNA RNA chromosome enzyme enzymes genetics mutagenesis mutation protoplast yeast

Authors and affiliations

  • John F. T. Spencer
    • 1
  • Dorothy M. Spencer
    • 1
  • I. J. Bruce
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesGoldsmith’s CollegeLondonGreat Britain
  2. 2.Department of Biology and Environmental HealthThames PolytechnicLondonGreat Britain

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-73356-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-18805-6
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-73356-7
  • Buy this book on publisher's site