Sleep Related Disorders and Internal Diseases

  • Jörg Hermann Peter
  • Thomas Podszus
  • P. von Wichert
Conference proceedings

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XX
  2. Sleep and Disordered Sleep

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. P. Lavie
      Pages 3-8
    3. W. P. Koella
      Pages 36-59
  3. Measurement

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 61-61
    2. S. A. Rothenberg
      Pages 63-74
    3. F. Pinciroli, R. Rossi, L. Vergani
      Pages 110-120
    4. N. Meslier, J. L. Racineux
      Pages 121-124
    5. F. Raschke, J. Mayer, T. Penzel, J. H. Peter, T. Podszus, P. Von Wichert
      Pages 135-139
    6. J. H. Peter, E. Fuchs, M. Hügens, U. Koehler, K. Meinzer, U. Müller et al.
      Pages 140-146
    7. K. Weber, B. Ehrig, E. Fuchs, T. Penzel, J. H. Peter
      Pages 147-156
    8. D. Rose, P. Aubry, T. Veleine, Z. Rida
      Pages 157-160

About these proceedings

Introduction

The normal function of the organism in various stages of activity can be seen as a process of mutual interaction of different regulation mechanisms building up the behaviour of the organism in changing situations and/or ages and/or levels of health or disease. Insights into these very complex relations which steer the action of the organism are particularly important for the study of internal medi­ cine. They can be seen as directly related to the understanding of pathological conditions. Recently, the medical community has focused its interest on the physiology and pathophysiology of events which happen during sleep. Although some information on pathological regulation during sleep was collected in the 1930s, the modern technology of registration methods is required to analyse the pheno­ mena of sleep-related physiological and pathophysiological patterns. It is intere­ sting that the modern research in this field developed from neuropsychiatry and is now expanding into other fields of medicine, although some problems, for instance the Pickwickian syndrome, were also for a long time considered part of the field of internal medicine. It becomes clearer that sleep is not only a neuro­ psychiatric phenomenon, but also has profound consequences for other physio­ logical circuits, perhaps even an important role in pathogenesis. Sleep also has profound consequences for internal diseases. This was shown very clearly recently by many groups, although their data have not yet received the attention which they deserve.

Keywords

catecholamines diagnostics electrocardiogram (ECG) internal medicine pathophysiology physiology psychiatry

Editors and affiliations

  • Jörg Hermann Peter
    • 1
  • Thomas Podszus
    • 1
  • P. von Wichert
    • 1
  1. 1.Zentrum für Innere Medizin Med. Poliklinik Baldinger StraßeMarburgGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-72560-9
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-72562-3
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-72560-9
  • About this book