Development of Sensory Systems

  • C. M. Bate
  • V. McM. Carr
  • P. P. C. Graziadei
  • H. V. B. Hirsch
  • A. Hughes
  • D. Ingle
  • A. G. Leventhal
  • G. A. Monti Graziadei
  • E. W. Rubel
  • R. Saxod
  • A. B. Scheibel
  • M. E. Scheibel
  • J. Silver
  • Marcus Jacobson

Part of the Handbook of Sensory Physiology book series (SENSORY, volume 9)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XI
  2. P. P. C. Graziadei, G. A. Monti Graziadei
    Pages 55-83
  3. Arthur F. Hughes, Virginia McMillan Carr
    Pages 85-114
  4. Madge E. Scheibel, Arnold B. Scheibel
    Pages 239-277
  5. Helmut V. B. Hirsch, Audie Gene Leventhal
    Pages 279-335
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 437-469

About this book

Introduction

This preface is addressed to the reader who wishes to inquire into the prevailing concepts, hypotheses and theories about development of sensory systems and wants to know how they are exemplified in the following chapters. I believe that science is hypothesis and theory and that the growth and evolution of any branch of science can be measured by the degree to which its theories have been reified. By that standard, one must conc1ude that developmental neuro­ biologie is in its infancy. The rapid accumulation of observations which has occurred in this branch of science in the past century leads to progress only to the extent that the facts validate or falsify hypotheses. The following chapters show that we have a plethora of facts but a dearth of hypotheses. Another index of the maturity of any branch of science is its level of historical self-awareness. Because the history of any branch of science is essentially the history of ideas and of the rise and fall of theories, the level of historical awareness is related to the extent to which reification of its hypothetical constructs has advanced. It is largely because few theories of development of sensory systems, or indeed, of developmental neurobiology, have progressed far in the process of reification that the his tory of developmental neurobiology remains unwritten. The subject of this volume is hardly mentioned in the many books devoted to the history of related disciplines.

Keywords

Ontogenie Sinnesorgan Systems biology development growth

Authors and affiliations

  • C. M. Bate
    • 1
  • V. McM. Carr
    • 2
  • P. P. C. Graziadei
    • 3
  • H. V. B. Hirsch
    • 4
  • A. Hughes
    • 5
  • D. Ingle
    • 6
  • A. G. Leventhal
    • 4
  • G. A. Monti Graziadei
    • 3
  • E. W. Rubel
    • 7
  • R. Saxod
    • 8
  • A. B. Scheibel
    • 9
  • M. E. Scheibel
    • 9
  • J. Silver
    • 10
  1. 1.Department of Neurobiology, Research School of Biological SciencesThe Australian National UniversityCanberra CityAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biological SciencesFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  4. 4.Center for NeurobiologyThe University at AlbanyAlbanyUSA
  5. 5.Department of AnatomyCase-Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  6. 6.Brandeis UniversityWalthamUSA
  7. 7.Department of Otolaryngology, Medical CenterUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  8. 8.Laboratoire de Zoologie et Biologie Animale Université Scientifique et MédicaleGrenobleFrance
  9. 9.Department of Anatomy, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  10. 10.Department of NeuroscienceThe Children’s Hospital Medical CenterBostonUSA

Editors and affiliations

  • Marcus Jacobson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Medical CenterUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-66880-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1978
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-66882-1
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-66880-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0072-9906
  • About this book