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Somatosensory System

  • D. Albe-Fessard
  • K. H. Andres
  • J. A. V. Bates
  • J. M. Besson
  • A. G. Brown
  • P. R. Burgess
  • I. Darian-Smith
  • M. v. Düring
  • G. Gordon
  • H. Hensel
  • E. Jones
  • B. Libet
  • O. Oscarsson
  • E. R. Perl
  • O. Pompeiano
  • T. P. S. Powell
  • M. Réthelyi
  • R. F. Schmidt
  • J. Semmes
  • S. Skoglund
  • J. Szentágothai
  • A. L. Towe
  • P. D. Wall
  • G. Werner
  • B. L. Whitsel
  • Y. Zotterman
  • Editors
  • Ainsley Iggo

Part of the Handbook of Sensory Physiology book series (SENSORY, volume 2)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XI
  2. Yngve Zotterman
    Pages 1-1
  3. Karl H. Andres, Monika von Düring
    Pages 3-28
  4. P. R. Burgess, E. R. Perl
    Pages 29-78
  5. Herbert Hensel
    Pages 79-110
  6. Sten Skoglund
    Pages 111-136
  7. George Gordon
    Pages 137-150
  8. M. Réthelyi, J. Szentágothai
    Pages 207-252
  9. Patrick D. Wall
    Pages 253-270
  10. Ian Darian-Smith
    Pages 271-314
  11. Ottavio Pompeiano
    Pages 381-488
  12. Denise Albe-Fessard, J. M. Besson
    Pages 489-560
  13. E. G. Jones, T. P. S. Powell
    Pages 579-620
  14. Gerhard Werner, Barry L. Whitsel
    Pages 621-700
  15. Back Matter
    Pages 791-851

About this book

Introduction

The waterproof sensory sheet covering the mammalian body has a rich afferent innervation which provides an abundance of complex information for use by the central nervous system often in conjunction with information from receptors in the joints. This book is an attempt to provide a systematic account of the way in which this somatosensory system works. The properties of the peripheral receptors have been debated in scientific terms for about a century and the resolu­ tion of the conflict in favour of the existence of 'specific' receptors for mechanical, thermal and noxious stimuli is reported and discussed in the opening chapters of the book. An awareness of this specificity has forced a re-consideration of the ways in which the central nervous system de-codes the information which is showered upon it. Advances in knowledge of the fine structure of the central nervous system have raised functional questions about the operation and organisation of the sensory systems in the spinal cord and brain. Fresh insight into the morphological complexity of the dorsal horn and higher levels of the nervous system gives the physiologist a clearer idea of the units with which he works. Progress has been made in understanding the function of sensory relay nuclei in general and indivi­ dual tracts in particular and is fully decomented.

Keywords

Sinnesphysiologie brain central nervous system complexity joint nervous system organizations physiology spinal cord

Authors and affiliations

  • D. Albe-Fessard
    • 1
  • K. H. Andres
    • 2
  • J. A. V. Bates
    • 3
  • J. M. Besson
    • 4
  • A. G. Brown
    • 5
  • P. R. Burgess
    • 6
  • I. Darian-Smith
    • 7
  • M. v. Düring
    • 2
  • G. Gordon
    • 8
  • H. Hensel
    • 9
  • E. Jones
    • 10
  • B. Libet
    • 11
    • 12
  • O. Oscarsson
    • 13
  • E. R. Perl
    • 14
  • O. Pompeiano
    • 15
  • T. P. S. Powell
    • 16
  • M. Réthelyi
    • 17
  • R. F. Schmidt
    • 18
  • J. Semmes
    • 19
  • S. Skoglund
    • 20
  • J. Szentágothai
    • 17
  • A. L. Towe
    • 21
  • P. D. Wall
    • 22
  • G. Werner
    • 23
  • B. L. Whitsel
    • 23
  • Y. Zotterman
    • 24
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Neurophysiologie GeneraleParis-16eFrance
  2. 2.Institut für Anatomie IIRuhr-Universität Bochum463 BochumWest Germany
  3. 3.Medical Research CouncilThe National Hospital for Nervous DiseasesLondon, W.C.1.Great Britain
  4. 4.Faculté des SciencesUniversité de ParisParis-16eFrance
  5. 5.Department of Veterinary PhysiologyUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghGreat Britain
  6. 6.Department of Physiology, College of MedicineUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  7. 7.Department of Physiology, School of MedicineThe John Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  8. 8.University Laboratory of PhysiologyUniversity MuseumOxfordGreat Britain
  9. 9.Physiologisches Institut der UniversitätWest Germany
  10. 10.Department of AnatomyUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand
  11. 11.Mt. Zion Neurological InstituteMt. Zion HospitalSan FranciscoUSA
  12. 12.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of California School of MedicineSan FranciscoUSA
  13. 13.Institute of PhysiologyUniversity of LundLundSweden
  14. 14.Department of Physiology, School of MedicineUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  15. 15.Istituto di Fisiologia Umana, Cattedra IIUniversita di PisaPisaItaly
  16. 16.Department of Human AnatomyUniversity of OxfordOxfordGreat Britain
  17. 17.1st Department of AnatomySemmelweis University Medical SchoolBudapest IXHungary
  18. 18.Physiologisches Institut der Universität Kiel23 KielWest Germany
  19. 19.Section on Perception, Laboratory of PsychologyNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  20. 20.StockholmSweden
  21. 21.Department of Physiology & Biophysics, School of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  22. 22.Department of AnatomyUniversity College LondonLondon, W.C.I.Great Britain
  23. 23.Department of Pharmacology, School of MedicineUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  24. 24.Kungl VeterinärhögskolanStockholm 50Sweden

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-65438-1
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1973
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-65440-4
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-65438-1
  • Series Print ISSN 0072-9906
  • Buy this book on publisher's site