Understanding Luminescence Spectra and Efficiency Using Wp and Related Functions

  • Charles W. Struck
  • William H. Fonger

Part of the Inorganic Chemistry Concepts book series (INORGANIC, volume 13)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XIII
  2. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 1-18
  3. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 19-23
  4. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 24-31
  5. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 32-59
  6. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 60-74
  7. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 75-76
  8. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 77-85
  9. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 86-109
  10. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 110-128
  11. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 129-172
  12. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 173-193
  13. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 194-197
  14. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 198-200
  15. Charles W. Struck, William H. Fonger
    Pages 201-203
  16. Back Matter
    Pages 204-255

About this book

Introduction

There are both a remote and a proximate history in the development of this book. We would like to acknowledge first the perceptiveness of the technical administrators at RCA Laboratories, Inc. during the 1970s, and in particular Dr. P. N. Yocom. Buoyed up by the financial importance of yttrium oxysulfide: europium as the red phosphor of color television tubes, they allowed us almost a decade of close cooperation aimed at understanding the performance of this phosphor. It is significant that we shared an approach to research in an industrial laboratory which allowed us to avoid the lure of "first-principles" approaches (which would have been severely premature) and freed us to formulate and to study the important issues directly. We searched for a semiquantitative understanding of the properties observed in luminescence, i. e. , where energy absorption occurs, where emission occurs, and with what efficiency this conversion process takes place. We were aware that the nonradi­ ative transition rates found in practice vary enormously with temperature and, for a given activator, with small changes in its environment. We traced the source of this enormous variation to the magnitude of the vibrational overlap integrals, which have strong dependences on the rearrangements occurring during optical transitions and on the vibrational number of the initial electronic state. We were willing to excise from the problem the electronic aspects - the electronic wavefunctions' and their transition integrals -by treating them as parameters to be obtained from the experimental data.

Keywords

Absorption Lumineszenz Strahlungsloser Übergang luminescence spectra

Authors and affiliations

  • Charles W. Struck
    • 1
  • William H. Fonger
    • 2
  1. 1.GTE Laboratories Inc.WalthamUSA
  2. 2.PrincetonUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-48629-6
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-48631-9
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-48629-6
  • Series Print ISSN 0172-7966
  • About this book