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The League of Nations, International Terrorism, and British Foreign Policy, 1934–1938

Palgrave Macmillan
  • Explores the history of the League of Nations following the rise of Hitler in the 1930s

  • Argues that the League made it possible for states to find common ground in order to keep the peace, guided by strong leadership from Britain and France

  • Evaluates the League’s efforts to combat state-supported terrorism through international legislation

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eBook USD 79.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-77200-4
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book USD 99.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book USD 139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

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Table of contents (10 chapters)

  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-x
  2. Introduction

    • Michael D. Callahan
    Pages 1-13
  3. “The Chief Danger in Europe at Present”

    • Michael D. Callahan
    Pages 15-39
  4. “The Most Stupid of Political Crimes”

    • Michael D. Callahan
    Pages 41-66
  5. “A War Before the War”

    • Michael D. Callahan
    Pages 67-90
  6. “Can We Do Something to Dissuade Yugoslavia?”

    • Michael D. Callahan
    Pages 91-117
  7. “Acts Specifically ‘Terrorist’ in Character”

    • Michael D. Callahan
    Pages 149-175
  8. “If Eden Gives Way We Are Lost”

    • Michael D. Callahan
    Pages 177-205
  9. Conclusion

    • Michael D. Callahan
    Pages 233-240
  10. Back Matter

    Pages 241-317

About this book

This book examines the League of Nations, state-supported terrorism, and British foreign policy after the rise of Hitler in the 1930s.  It argues that with strong leadership from Britain and France, the League made it possible for states to preserve the peace of Europe after terrorists aided by Italy and Hungary killed the King of Yugoslavia in 1934.  This achievement represents the League at its most effective and demonstrates that the organization could carry out its peacekeeping functions.  The League also made it possible to draft two international conventions to suppress and punish acts of terrorism.  While both conventions were examples of productive collaboration, in the end, few governments supported the League’s anti-terrorism project in itself.  Still, for Britain, Geneva served the cause of peace by helping states to settle their differences by mediation and concession while promoting international cooperation, a central conviction of British “appeasement” policy in the 1930s.   

Keywords

  • State-supported terrorism
  • British foreign policy
  • France
  • King of Yugoslavia
  • Peacekeeping
  • Diplomacy
  • International relations
  • Anti-terrorism
  • Appeasement policy
  • Rise of Hitler
  • Interwar

Authors and Affiliations

  • Department of Liberal Studies, Kettering University, Flint, USA

    Michael D. Callahan

About the author

Michael D. Callahan is Professor of History and Frances Willson Thompson Professor of Leadership Studies at Kettering University, USA.  He is author of Mandates and Empire: The League of Nations and Africa, 1914-1931 (1999/2008) and A Sacred Trust: The League of Nations and Africa, 1929-1946 (2004).  

Bibliographic Information

Buying options

eBook USD 79.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-77200-4
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book USD 99.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book USD 139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)