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  • © 2021

The Challenges of Resolving the Israeli–Palestinian Dispute

An Impossible Peace?

Palgrave Macmillan

Authors:

  • Provides the overarching reason why the Israeli–Palestinian dispute is so resistant to resolution, and is pitched at the general, mystified, public

  • Argues that the Israeli–Palestinian dispute consists of multiple conflicts, and that each of these conflicts are one of two distinct types of conflict

  • Shows that until policy makers see the dispute through the prism of the territorial/existential dichotomy, future attempts at peace will be all but certain to fail

Buying options

eBook USD 109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-63185-7
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book USD 139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book USD 139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

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Table of contents (19 chapters)

  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-ix
  2. Introduction

    • Bren Carlill
    Pages 1-13
  3. The Territorial/Existential Dichotomy

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 15-15
    2. Multiple Conflicts

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 17-28
    3. Two Types of Conflict

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 29-39
    4. Three Distinct Conflicts

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 41-53
    5. Why the Dichotomy Is Overlooked

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 55-61
  4. The History of the Dispute (until 1993)

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 63-64
    2. Before 1947

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 65-71
    3. 1947–1967

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 73-79
    4. 1967–1973

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 81-87
    5. 1973–1982

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 89-100
    6. 1982–1993

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 101-111
  5. The Oslo Peace Process

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 113-114
    2. Israeli Perceptions of Palestinian Actions

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 115-132
    3. Other Israeli Perceptions

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 133-151
    4. Palestinian Perceptions of External Factors

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 153-175
    5. Palestinian Perceptions of Internal Factors

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 177-204
  6. The Post-Oslo Period

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 205-207
    2. Continuing Trends

      • Bren Carlill
      Pages 209-224

About this book

‘Balanced and cogently argued, this important and original book should be read by anyone who wants to better understand the Palestinian–Israeli conflict and why it remains so intractable. Even when I disagree with Bren Carlill, I find his ideas compelling.’

Yossi Klein Halevi, Senior Fellow, Shalom Hartman Institute, and author of Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor

This book explains why the Israeli–Palestinian dispute is so difficult to resolve by showing that it consists of multiple distinct conflicts. Because these tend to be conflated into a single conflict, attempts at peace have not worked. Underpinned by conflict theory, observations of those involved and analyses of polling data, the book argues that peace will not be possible until each of the dispute’s distinct conflicts are managed.

Early chapters establish a theoretical framework to explain and define the different conflicts. This framework is then applied to the history of the dispute. The actions and perceptions of Israelis and Palestinians make sense when viewed through this framework. The Oslo peace process is examined in detail to explain how and why each side’s expectations were not met. Ultimately, lessons in ways to build a future viable peace are drawn from the failures of the past.

Bren Carlill has spent over 20 years professionally or academically focused on the Israeli–Palestinian dispute, including living in Israel for several years. He has also worked in Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the Department of Home Affairs, where he focused on the civil and human rights conditions and the security situations of various Middle East and South Asian countries.

 

 

Keywords

  • Israeli–Palestinian dispute
  • Israel
  • Palestine
  • Middle East
  • Arab–Israeli conflict
  • peace studies

Reviews

“Carlill’s tools of analysis, for anyone who has been dealing with the conflict for as long as I have, come as a very refreshing clarification of things that we always vaguely understood. To be given these definitions in clear and well-organised language is a serious contribution to the discussion.” (Eran Lerman, Vice President of the Jerusalem Institute for Strategy and Security, and former Israeli deputy national security adviser)

“Balanced and cogently argued, this important and original book should be read by anyone who wants to better understand the Palestinian­–Israeli conflict and why it remains so intractable. Even when I disagree with Bren Carlill, I find his ideas compelling.” (Yossi Klein Halevi, Senior Fellow, Shalom Hartman Institute, and author of Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor)

“Bren Carlill’s proposed “territorial/existential dichotomy” offers an innovative and at times provocative approach to the apparently intractable conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians. By applying that approach to failed negotiations of the past (notably, the Oslo Accords, beginning in 1993), Carlill demonstrates that negotiations involving “existentialist” goals on one or both sides are doomed to failure, and that even negotiated settlements between “territorialists” of good faith may not survive unless the determined efforts of “existentialists” to scuttle their progress are recognized by both sides from the beginning.” (David Mesher, Professor, San José State University, USA)

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melbourne, Australia

    Bren Carlill

About the author

Bren Carlill has spent over 20 years professionally or academically focused on the Israeli–Palestinian dispute, including living in Israel for several years. He has also worked in Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the Department of Home Affairs, where he focused on the civil and human rights conditions and the security situations of various Middle East and South Asian countries.

 

Bibliographic Information

Buying options

eBook USD 109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-63185-7
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book USD 139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book USD 139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)