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Beyond Slacktivism

Political Participation on Social Media

  • James Dennis

Part of the Interest Groups, Advocacy and Democracy Series book series (IGAD)

About this book

Introduction

Beyond Slacktivism examines how routine social media use shapes political participation. Many commentators have argued that activism has been compromised by “slacktivism,” a pejorative term that refers to supposedly inauthentic, low-threshold forms of engagement online. Dennis argues that this critique has an overly narrow focus. He offers a novel theoretical framework—the continuum of participation—to help illuminate how and why citizens use social networking sites to consume news, discuss civic matters, and engage in politics. This idea is explored in two interrelated settings. Firstly, in an activist context, through an ethnography of the campaigning organisation 38 Degrees. Secondly, within day-to-day life, by combining evidence of behaviour online with reflective diaries. Drawing on this rich data on individual-level attitudes and behaviours, Dennis challenges slacktivism as a judgement on contemporary political action. Beyond Slacktivism provides an account of how the seemingly mundane everyday use of social media can be beneficial to democracy.

 

James Dennis is Senior Lecturer in Political Communication and Journalism at the University of Portsmouth, UK.

 

Keywords

slacktivism political participation activism social media Facebook Twitter Britain

Authors and affiliations

  • James Dennis
    • 1
  1. 1.Film, Media and CommunicationUniversity of PortsmouthPortsmouthUK

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-00844-4
  • Copyright Information The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG, part of Springer Nature 2019
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, Cham
  • eBook Packages Political Science and International Studies
  • Print ISBN 978-3-030-00843-7
  • Online ISBN 978-3-030-00844-4
  • Buy this book on publisher's site