Quantitative Risk Assessment

Biomedical Ethics Reviews · 1986

  • James M. Humber
  • Robert F. Almeder

Part of the Biomedical Ethics Reviews book series (BER)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Introduction

    1. James M. Humber, Robert F. Almeder
      Pages 1-5
  3. Quantitative Risk Assessment

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 7-7
    2. Kenneth A. Busch, Theodore J. Meinhardt, Mary A. Ballew
      Pages 9-55
    3. Dale Hattis, John A. Smith Jr.
      Pages 57-105
    4. Marvin A. Schneiderman
      Pages 107-128
    5. Bruce C. Allen, Kenny S. Crump
      Pages 129-146
  4. Quantitative Risk Assessment

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 147-147
    2. Kristin Shrader-Frechette
      Pages 149-170
    3. Mary Gibson
      Pages 171-203
    4. Nicholas Rescher
      Pages 225-237
    5. James Humber, Robert Almeder
      Pages 239-262
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 263-278

About this book

Introduction

The National Science Foundation, The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, and the Center for Technology and Humanities at Georgia State University sponsored a two-day national conference on Moral Issues and Public Policy Issues in the Use of the Method of Quantitative Risk Assessment ( QRA) on September 26 and 27, 1985, in Atlanta, Georgia. The purpose of the conference was to promote discussion among practicing risk assessors, senior government health officials extensively involved in the practice of QRA, and moral philosophers familiar with the method. The conference was motivated by the disturbing fact that distinguished scientists ostensibly employing the same method of quantitative risk assessment to the same substances conclude to widely varying and mutually exclusive assessments of safety, depending on which of the various assumptions they employ when using the method. In short, the conference was motivated by widespread concern over the fact that QRA often yields results that are quite controversial and frequently contested by some who, in professedly using the same method, manage to arrive at significantly different estimates of risk.

Keywords

Biomedical ethics Medical Ethics ethics health morality

Editors and affiliations

  • James M. Humber
    • 1
  • Robert F. Almeder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyGeorgia State UniversityAtlantaUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59259-656-0
  • Copyright Information Humana Press 1987
  • Publisher Name Humana Press, Totowa, NJ
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4757-6334-8
  • Online ISBN 978-1-59259-656-0
  • Series Print ISSN 0742-1796
  • About this book