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Fundamentals of Comparative Vertebrate Endocrinology

  • I. Chester-Jones
  • P. M. Ingleton
  • J. G. Phillips

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Structure of Steroidogenic Tissues and Their Modes of Secretion

  3. Reproduction in Nonmammalian Vertebrates

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 123-123
    2. S. Harvey, C. G. Scanes, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 125-185
    3. Ian P. Callard, S. M. Kleis
      Pages 187-205
    4. Frank L. Moore
      Pages 207-221
    5. A. P. Scott
      Pages 223-256
    6. Ian P. Callard, S.-m. Ho
      Pages 257-282
  4. The Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 283-283
    2. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 285-409
  5. Secretion of Endocrine Glands and Their Relationship to Osmoregulation

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 411-411
    2. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 413-443
    3. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 445-480
    4. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 481-495
    5. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 497-508
  6. Endocrine and Related Factors in the Control of Metabolism in Nonmammalian Vertebrates

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 509-509
    2. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 511-513
    3. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 515-540
    4. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 541-578
    5. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 579-622
    6. I. Chester-Jones, P. M. Ingleton, J. G. Phillips
      Pages 623-660
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 661-666

About this book

Introduction

Endocrinology, as a discipline, was a late arrival in the corpus of established subjects. Its growth in recent years has been prodigious, extending from mor­ phology to molecular levels. Most of the major endocrine glands were noted by the early anatomists, although the adrenal glands were not described until 1563 by Bartholomaeus Eustachius (1520-1574). On the other hand, elucidation of the function of these glands was extremely slow. Key work by A. A. Berthold (1849), although overlooked at the time, showed that comb atrophy in castrated fowl was prevented by testis transplantation. The idea that glands produced substances reach­ ing the bloodstream directly and not via excretory ducts stemmed from Claude Bernard, who first used the term internal secretion in 1855. The clinical observa­ tions of Thomas Addison at Guy's Hospital-published as a monograph in 1855 entitled The Constitutional and Local Effects of Disease of the Suprarenal Capsules -were seminal. However, the stimulus of this early research did not bring imme­ diate widespread further investigations. Upon the discovery of secretin in 1902, Bayliss and Starling considered the term "internal secretion" to be clumsy, and the term "hormone" was coined (from OQ[!UW-1 excite or arouse) and it was first used by Starling in his Croonian of 1905.

Keywords

adrenal gland endocrine gland endocrinology growth hormone

Editors and affiliations

  • I. Chester-Jones
    • 1
  • P. M. Ingleton
    • 1
  • J. G. Phillips
    • 2
  1. 1.Sheffield UniversitySheffieldUK
  2. 2.Loughborough University of TechnologyLoughboroughUK

Bibliographic information