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European Neogene Mammal Chronology

  • Everett H. Lindsay
  • Volker Fahlbusch
  • Pierre Mein

Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 180)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Aspects of European Mammal Chronology

    1. Everett H. Lindsay
      Pages 1-14
    2. Fritz F. Steininger, Raymond L. Bernor, Volker Fahlbusch
      Pages 15-46
    3. Muhsin Sümengen, Engin Ünay, Gercek Sarac, Hans de Bruijn, Ismail Terlemez, Mustafa Gürbüz
      Pages 61-72
    4. P. Mein
      Pages 73-90
    5. Oldrich Fejfar, Wolf-Dieter Heinrich
      Pages 91-117
  3. Regional Papers

  4. Faunal Datum Papers

  5. Biogeographic Synthesis

  6. Paleoecological Synthesis

    1. Berna Alpagut, Peter Andrews, Lawrence Martin
      Pages 443-459
    2. M. A. Alvarez Sierra, M. Díaz Molina, J. I. Lacomba, N. López Martínez
      Pages 461-474
    3. Peter Andrews
      Pages 487-494
  7. Magnetostratigraphic Applications

    1. N. Opdyke, P. Mein, E. Moissenet, A. Pérez-González, E. Lindsay, M. Petko
      Pages 507-514
  8. Sequences Outside Europe

    1. John C. Barry, Lawrence J. Flynn
      Pages 557-571
    2. Louis L. Jacobs, Lawrence J. Flynn, William R. Downs, John C. Barry
      Pages 573-586
  9. New Perspectives

    1. Volker Fahlbusch, Pierre Mein
      Pages 625-628
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 629-658

About this book

Introduction

During the last ZO years great progress has been achieved in our understanding of both earth history and vertebrate evolution. The result is that climatic/tectonic events in earth history can now be placed in a more precise and global time frame, that permit their evaluation as abiotic causal factors which might trigger extinction and dispersal events in vertebrate history. Great strides have also been made in genetics and cell biology, providing new insight into phylogenetic relationships among many vertebrates. These new data, along with data on chronologie resolution of earth history, provide tests of previous interpretations regarding ancestral-descendant relationships based solely on the fossil record. It is fitting and proper that a volume on European Neogene mammal chronology is produced at this time, to ensure that new interpretations of vertebrate evolution and chronology are based on the most accurate and current data. Vertebrate paleon­ tologists believe that the fossil record is the only secure data for measuring the actual course and tempo of vertebrate evolution. Knowledge of the fossil record must keep pace with advances in other areas of science so that inferences on vertebrate evolu­ tion are accurate and meaningful.

Keywords

Tempo biology development evolution pleistocene

Editors and affiliations

  • Everett H. Lindsay
    • 1
  • Volker Fahlbusch
    • 2
  • Pierre Mein
    • 3
  1. 1.University of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.University of MunichMunichFederal Republic of Germany
  3. 3.Claude Bernard UniversityLyonFrance

Bibliographic information