Standardization of Epidemiologic Studies of Host Susceptibility

  • Janice S. Dorman

Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 270)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Epidemiologic Standards for Diamond

    1. Ronald E. LaPorte, Daniel McCarty, Eugene Tull, Ingrid Libman, Masato Matsushima
      Pages 7-12
    2. Jaakko Tuomilehto, Toomas Podar, Bela Adojaan, Irina Kalits, Eva Tuomilehto-Wolf, Marjatta Karvonen et al.
      Pages 13-25
    3. Naoko Tajima, Masato Matsushima
      Pages 27-33
  3. Familial IDDM Epidemiology

    1. Evgene V. Shubnikov, Lada A. Kalashnikova
      Pages 43-45
    2. Gyula Soltész, Hungarian Childhood Diabetes Epidemiology Study Group
      Pages 47-52
    3. Graziella Bruno, Mauro Giorio, Gianfranco Pagano
      Pages 53-56
    4. Toomas Podar, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Eva Tuomilehto-Wolf, Ronald E. LaPorte, Janice S. Dorman
      Pages 57-67
    5. Cristina Daielli, Renata Lorini, Miryam Martinetti, Luisella Cortona, Mariaclara Cuccia, Letizia Vitali et al.
      Pages 77-82
    6. Teresa Frazer de Llado, Ramiro Milan, Gladys Veray, Magalys Soto, Arthur Hupka, Peggy Bull et al.
      Pages 83-88
  4. Methods for Epidemiologic Studies of Host Susceptibility

    1. Janice S. Dorman, Mirjana Kocova, Leslie A. O’Leary, Mary Kaye Kramer, Massimo Trucco
      Pages 89-99
    2. Robert E. Ferrell
      Pages 117-124
    3. Bernhard O. Boehm, Werner A. Scherbaum
      Pages 125-133
    4. Paul Zimmet, Ian R. Mackay, Merrill Rowley, William Knowles, Susan W. Serjeantson
      Pages 135-143

About this book

Introduction

The incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (100M) varies dramatically across racial groups and countries, with annual age-adjusted rates of approximately 40/100,000 per year in Finland, but only 0.51100,000 per year in China. Although reasons for these marked geographic differences are unknown, it is likely that genetic variations across populations play a m~or role. To determine the contribution of genetic factors to the global patterns of 100M incidence, international comparative studies are now being undertaken as part of the WHO Multinational Project for Childhood Oiabetes, known as the DIAMOND Project. It is, therefore, necessary to develop and implement epidemiologic standards for these investigations which can be applied across populations. This will ensure that comparable data are obtained in all countries, and that relevant scientific questions can be properly addressed. The development of standards for molecular epidemiologic studies of 100M is the of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop. During this meeting at the objective University of Pittsburgh, scientists from across the world convened to discuss issues relating to the standardization of: 1. the collection of family history data to assess the risk of 100M in first degree relatives, 2. case-control molecular epidemiology studies of 100M susceptibility, 3. HLA family studies, 4. laboratory methods and ONA technology transfer for genetic marker evaluations.

Keywords

Diabetes World Health Organization development epidemiological epidemiology molecular epidemiology

Editors and affiliations

  • Janice S. Dorman
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Public HealthUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-1213-8
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1994
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4899-1215-2
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4899-1213-8
  • About this book