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Mental Health Interventions with Preschool Children

  • Robert D. Lyman
  • Toni L. Hembree-Kigin

Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 1-20
  3. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 21-42
  4. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 43-64
  5. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 65-84
  6. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 85-103
  7. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 105-122
  8. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 123-141
  9. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 143-161
  10. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 163-179
  11. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 181-197
  12. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 199-218
  13. Robert D. Lyman, Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    Pages 219-235
  14. Back Matter
    Pages 237-296

About this book

Introduction

Preschool children have been largely neglected in the mental health treatment literature, although research has established that many behavioral and emotional disorders in children result from events occurring during the preschool years or are first manifested during this period. This has occurred for several reasons. Traditional psychoanalytic thinking has considered preschoolers to be too psychologically immature for complete manifestations of psychopathology, and the limited language abilities of young children have complicated assessment procedures and made them less appropriate for treatment approaches that are largely verbal in nature. In addition, the developmental complexity of the preschool period has deterred many researchers from investigating clinical issues with this age group. Partly as a result of the lack of information on preschoolers in the literature, practitioners have historically been uncomfortable in conduct­ ing assessments and initiating treatment with young children. They have often adopted a "wait and see" attitude in which formal mental health diagnosis and treatment are not implemented until after the child's entry into school. Unfortunately, such a delay may mean wasting the time during which mental health interventions can be maximally effective. Recently, this attitude has changed and practitioners now recognize the need for assessment and treatment of behavioral and emotional disorders early in life. What they require to assist them in the timely delivery of such services is information about assessment and treatment procedures specifically designed for preschoolers and with demonstrated efficacy with that age group.

Keywords

Depression assessment attention etiology intervention learning

Authors and affiliations

  • Robert D. Lyman
    • 1
  • Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  2. 2.Early Childhood Mental Health ServicesTempeUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-0958-9
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1994
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4899-0960-2
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4899-0958-9
  • Series Print ISSN 1574-0471
  • Buy this book on publisher's site