The Experience of Science

An Interdisciplinary Approach

  • Martin Goldstein
  • Inge Goldstein

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxiv
  2. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 1-6
  3. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 7-19
  4. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 21-28
  5. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 29-71
  6. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 73-91
  7. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 93-145
  8. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 147-181
  9. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 183-262
  10. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 263-278
  11. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 279-285
  12. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 287-292
  13. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 293-316
  14. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 317-325
  15. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 327-341
  16. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 343-359
  17. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 361-370
  18. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 371-376
  19. Martin Goldstein, Inge Goldstein
    Pages 377-390
  20. Back Matter
    Pages 391-400

About this book

Introduction

Our earlier book, How We Know: An Exploration of the Scientific Process, was written to give some conception of what the scientific approach is like, how to recognize it, how to distinguish it from other approaches to understanding the world, and to give some feeling for the intellectual excitement and aesthetic satisfactions of science. These goals represented our concept of the term "scientific literacy." Though the book was written for the general reader, to our surprise and gratification it was also used as a text in about forty colleges, and some high schools, for courses in science for the non-scientist, in methodology of science for social and behavioral sciences, and in the philosophy of science. As a result we were encouraged to write a textbook with essentially the same purpose and basic approach, but at a level appropriate to college students. We have drawn up problems for those chapters that would benefit from them, described laboratory experiments that illustrate important points discussed in the text, and made suggestions for additional readings, term papers, and other projects. Throughout the book we have introduced a number of chapters and appendices that provide examples of the uses of quantitative thinking in the sciences: logic, math­ ematics, probability, statistics, and graphical representation.

Keywords

behavior experiment logic mathematics philosophy

Authors and affiliations

  • Martin Goldstein
    • 1
  • Inge Goldstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Yeshiva UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-0384-6
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1984
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4899-0386-0
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4899-0384-6
  • About this book