Nursing Informatics

Where Caring and Technology Meet

  • Marion J. Ball
  • Kathryn J. Hannah
  • Susan K. Newbold
  • Judith V. Douglas

Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxi
  2. Integration

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-2
    2. Marion J. Ball, Judith V. Douglas, Susan K. Newbold
      Pages 3-9
    3. Nancy M. Lorenzi, Robert T. Riley
      Pages 10-26
    4. James M. Gabler
      Pages 27-39
    5. Diane J. Skiba
      Pages 40-53
    6. Susan K. Newbold, Miriam Jaffe
      Pages 54-68
  3. Roles for Informatics Nurse Specialists

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 69-70
    2. Marion J. Ball, Kathryn J. Hannah, Susan K. Newbold
      Pages 71-76
    3. Elizabeth E. Concordia, Gary L. Hammon
      Pages 95-98
  4. Clinical Applications and Nursing Informatics

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 99-100
    2. Ann Warnock-Matheron, Kathryn J. Hannah
      Pages 101-111
    3. Kathleen A. McCormick
      Pages 112-129
    4. Shirley J. Hughes
      Pages 144-154
    5. Margaret M. Hassett, Marjorie H. Farver
      Pages 155-166
    6. Kathleen M. Andolina
      Pages 167-183
    7. Karen Lafferty Zimmerman
      Pages 184-187

About this book

Introduction

Since its publication in 1988, Nursing Informatics: Where Caring and Technology Meet has established itself as the premier reference text in the field for nurses, nursing administrators, nursing students, and other health care professionals who seek a state-of-the-art review of the role of information technology in the nursing profession. The second edition of this seminal work addresses the growth and evolution of the nursing informatics discipline and how the rapid and far reaching changes that are occurring in information technology and in health care are impacting nurses. In addition to a new section on Integration, the second edition includes all new chapters on: the national health information infrastructure; reengineering health care and business processes; electronic resources for nursing; usability concepts and the clinical workstation; impact of information technology of cost/benefit and efficiency/effectiveness analysis; ubiquitous computing and the nurse; home health care systems; information management and long-term care; the information needs of nurse managed centers; critical path/care map and case management needs; large databases and their implications for planning and health policy; virtual reality; and defining the informatics nurse specialist.

Keywords

Information Technology (IT) information technology nursing

Editors and affiliations

  • Marion J. Ball
    • 1
  • Kathryn J. Hannah
    • 2
  • Susan K. Newbold
    • 3
  • Judith V. Douglas
    • 1
  1. 1.Information ServicesUniversity of MarylandBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Community Health Sciences Faculty of MedicineThe University of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  3. 3.University of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4757-2428-8
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1995
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4757-2430-1
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4757-2428-8
  • Series Print ISSN 1431-1917
  • About this book