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Problems in General Surgery

  • Jack Pickleman

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvii
  2. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 1-21
  3. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 23-49
  4. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 51-69
  5. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 71-106
  6. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 107-140
  7. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 141-172
  8. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 173-199
  9. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 201-238
  10. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 239-256
  11. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 257-280
  12. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 281-299
  13. Jack Pickleman
    Pages 301-340
  14. Back Matter
    Pages 341-363

About this book

Introduction

All around us, in this age of consumerism, are expressions of public expectations regarding the quality of medical care. Among the responses of the medical profession to this growing public demand has been a cre­ scendo of interest in continuing education. Continuing education is not a new concern for the physician. Most major professional organizations were founded to increase the exchange of information among members. But something new is in the wind. Both inside and outside the profes­ sion, the question is becoming more and more insistent: What does at­ tendance at meetings or exposure to other types of prepared materials have to do with the quality of care that is provided? Recertification, reexamination, and peer review of outcomes of practice-subjects only recently unmentionable-have become common issues before specialty boards, legislatures, hospital boards, insurance carriers, and even medical societies. As of October of 1979, all 22 of the member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties had made commitments to the principle of periodic recertification of their members. Most boards have explicitly acknowledged that the cognitive skills measured in the objective examination do not assure clinical competence. An assumption behind information-assessing recertification efforts is that, though mastery of the current knowledge upon which clinical decisions should be made does not guarantee competent practice, the lack of it probably impairs competent practice.

Keywords

age cancer care certification education general surgery hospital inflammatory bowel disease organizations outcome quality surgery trauma

Authors and affiliations

  • Jack Pickleman
    • 1
  1. 1.Loyola University Stritch School of MedicineMaywoodUSA

Bibliographic information