Tractors and their Power Units

  • John B. Liljedahl
  • Paul K. Turnquist
  • David W. Smith
  • Makoto Hoki

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 1-19
  3. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 20-36
  4. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 37-47
  5. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 48-76
  6. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 77-133
  7. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 134-155
  8. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 156-182
  9. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 183-202
  10. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 203-239
  11. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 240-271
  12. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 272-313
  13. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 314-359
  14. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 360-402
  15. John B. Liljedahl, Paul K. Turnquist, David W. Smith, Makoto Hoki
    Pages 403-443
  16. Back Matter
    Pages 445-463

About this book

Introduction

At the time of the writing of the fourth edirion of this textbook, the agricultural economy in the United States and Canada was depressed. The prices paid to farmers for their grain crops were very low, and consequently most farmers in North America could not afford to buy a new tractor when needed; there­ fore, the sales of tractors and other farm machines were much below normal. The farmer who was the victim of the depressed economy was forced to "make do." Instead of purchasing a new tractor when the old one needed to be replaced, the farmer usually purchased a used or second-hand tractor or repaired the old one. In a strict sense, tractors usually do not wear out; instead, they become obsolete. The farmer who owns an obsolete tractor would prefer to replace it with one having more power, more speeds, more conveniences, a better hydraulic system, lower operating cost, or all of the above. But farmers in the United States, Canada, and other industrial nations will continue to want to purchase tractors that have all of the features, in­ cluding microprocessors, found on other vehicles.

Keywords

economy mechanics system time tractor

Authors and affiliations

  • John B. Liljedahl
    • 1
  • Paul K. Turnquist
    • 2
  • David W. Smith
    • 3
  • Makoto Hoki
    • 4
  1. 1.Agricultural Engineering DepartmentPurdue UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Agricultural Engineering DepartmentAuburn UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Technical Center Deere & CompanyUSA
  4. 4.Department of Agricultural MachineryMie UniversityTsuJapan

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-6632-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-6634-8
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-6632-4
  • About this book