Industrial Robot Handbook

  • Authors
  • Richard┬áK.┬áMiller

Part of the VNR Competitive Manufacturing Series book series (VNRCMS)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-vii
  2. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 1-9
  3. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 10-25
  4. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 26-46
  5. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 47-60
  6. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 61-69
  7. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 70-76
  8. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 77-82
  9. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 90-96
  10. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 97-101
  11. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 102-109
  12. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 110-126
  13. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 127-130
  14. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 131-145
  15. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 146-152
  16. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 153-173
  17. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 174-182
  18. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 183-197
  19. Richard K. Miller
    Pages 198-205

About this book

Introduction

These are exciting times for manufacturing engineers. It has been said that American industry will undergo greater changes during the 1980 and 1990 decades than it did during the entire eight preceding decades of this century. The industrial robot has become the symbol of this progress in computer-integrated manufacturing. This book is for engineers and managers in manufacturing industries who are involved in implementing robotics in their operations. With tens of thousands of industrial robots already in use in the United States, there are plenty of role models for proposed applications to be patterned after. This book provides an overview of robot applications and presents case histories that might suggest applications to engineers and managers for implementation in their own facilities. The application of industrial robots were well developed in the late 1970s and early 1980s. While the reader may note some of the examples discussed in this handbook incorporate older robot models, it is the application that is of interest. As Joseph Engelberger, the founding father of robotics has pointed out, industrial robots in 1988 are "doing pretty much the same kind of work" as they did in 1980.

Keywords

computer computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) engine industrial robot industry manufacturing robot robotics

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-6608-9
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-6610-2
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-6608-9
  • About this book