Steroid Hormone Resistance

Mechanisms and Clinical Aspects

  • George P. Chrousos
  • D. Lynn Loriaux
  • Mortimer B. Lipsett

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 196)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Molecular Actions of Steroid Hormones

    1. Bert W. O’Malley, William T. Schrader, Ming-Jer Tsai
      Pages 1-10
    2. Gerald Litwack, Thomas J. Schmidt, Andrea Miller-Diener, Maria Webb, Peter Bodine, Carol A. Barnett et al.
      Pages 11-22
    3. Merry R. Sherman, Fe B. Tuazon, Yee-Wan Stevens, Joseph A. Carlino, En-Mei Niu
      Pages 23-51
  3. Glucocorticoid Functions and Resistance

    1. Emily P. Slater, Thomas Anderson, Peter Cattini, Randi Isaacs, Morris J. Birnbaum, David G. Gardner et al.
      Pages 67-80
    2. Allan Munck, Paul M. Guyre
      Pages 81-96
    3. Mortimer B. Lipsett, Masako Tomita, David D. Brandon, Monique M. De Vroede, D. Lynn Loriaux, George P. Chrousos
      Pages 97-109
    4. George P. Chrousos, D. Lynn Loriaux, Masako Tomita, David D. Brandon, David Renquist, Barry Albertson et al.
      Pages 129-144
  4. Mineralocorticoid Action and Resistance

    1. John W. Funder
      Pages 145-152
    2. P. W. Speiser, E. Stoner, M. I. New
      Pages 173-195
    3. Walter J. Meyer III
      Pages 197-211
  5. Androgen Action and Resistance

    1. James F. Catterall, Cheryl S. Watson, Kimmo K. Kontula, Olli A. Janne, C. Wayne Bardin
      Pages 213-226
    2. Terry R. Brown, Claude J. Migeon
      Pages 227-255
    3. William J. Kovacs, James E. Griffin, Jean D. Wilson
      Pages 257-267
    4. Leslie P. Bullock
      Pages 269-278
  6. Female Sex Steroids: New Aspects on the Mechanism of Action and Resistance States

    1. John G. Compton, William T. Schrader, Bert W. O’Malley
      Pages 291-304

About this book

Introduction

This volume represents the first attempt to present in one place the clinical syndromes and the pathophysiologic basis for the "resistance states" to each of the classes of steroid hormones. Glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, progesterone and vitamin D have widely diverse roles ranging from the control of homeostasis to reproduction and bone formation. They are similar in that they share a chemical structure and that their action is in the cell nucleus where they induce transcription of specific genes leading to synthesis of function-specific proteins. Clinical syndromes of steroid hormone resistance to androgens (complete and partial testicular feminization), aldosterone (pseudo­ hypoaldosteronism) and vitamin D (vitamin D-dependent rickets type II) have been known for many years. Progesterone and glucocorticoid resistance syndromes have been described only recently. Resistance to estrogens has not been reported in man or in animals. It is hoped that a detailed reexamination of what is known about each of these conditions at the clinical and molecular levels will enhance our understanding of the function of these hormones and their mechanisms of action. New insight and research initiatives should result. G.P. Chrousos D.L. Loriaus M.B. Lipsett vii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The contents of this volume are based in part on the proceedings of an International Conference held in Bethesda in the summer of 1984. This conference was sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland.

Keywords

Vitamin D protein proteins synthesis transcription

Editors and affiliations

  • George P. Chrousos
    • 1
  • D. Lynn Loriaux
    • 1
  • Mortimer B. Lipsett
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-5101-6
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1986
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-5103-0
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-5101-6
  • Series Print ISSN 0065-2598
  • About this book