The Heredity of Behavior Disorders in Adults and Children

  • Steven G. Vandenberg
  • Sandra Manes Singer
  • David L. Pauls

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiv
  2. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 1-6
  3. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 7-30
  4. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 31-47
  5. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 49-79
  6. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 81-94
  7. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 95-119
  8. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 121-139
  9. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 141-162
  10. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 163-172
  11. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 173-184
  12. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 185-188
  13. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 189-199
  14. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 201-207
  15. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 209-216
  16. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 217-230
  17. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 231-235
  18. Steven G. Vandenberg, Sandra Manes Singer, David L. Pauls
    Pages 237-251
  19. Back Matter
    Pages 253-301

About this book

Introduction

Current trends in morbidity suggest that by the beginning of the twen­ ty-first century, psychiatric illness may become the most pressing problem in public health in many of the advanced countries. As ably demonstrated by Vandenberg, Singer, and Pauls, the principal identifia­ ble etiology of the major psychiatric disorders is heredity; if progress is to be made in prevention and treatment of these disorders, it may have to come from improved understanding of their inheritance. A relentless increase has been observed in the frequency of mood disorders, primarily major depression but also manic-depressive ill­ ness, appearing earlier and more frequently in each age cohort born since (approximately) 1940. Because major depression is a recurrent disorder, whose episodes increase in frequency with age, the number of observed depressions can be expected to increase dramatically as these people reach middle and old age. The rate of suicide has also increased enormously, according to birth cohort. Starting with people born around 1935, the rate of suicide between 15 and 19 years of age has increased more than 10 times from the earliest to the most recent birth cohorts. What is not clear is if there will be a compensatory reduction in suicide rate as this cohort ages, because people likely to commit suicide will have done so earlier, or if this presages a general increase in suicide, comparable to the increase in mood disorders and perhaps a function of them.

Keywords

depression mood disorder prevention psychiatric disorder suicide

Authors and affiliations

  • Steven G. Vandenberg
    • 1
  • Sandra Manes Singer
    • 2
  • David L. Pauls
    • 3
  1. 1.University of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.University of Southern IndianaEvansvilleUSA
  3. 3.Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-5071-2
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1986
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-5073-6
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-5071-2
  • About this book