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The Patient

Biological, Psychological, and Social Dimensions of Medical Practice

  • Hoyle Leigh
  • Morton F. Reiser

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxx
  2. On Becoming a Patient

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 3-15
    3. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 17-24
    4. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 25-38
  3. On Being a Patient

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 39-39
    2. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 41-76
    3. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 77-98
    4. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 99-141
    5. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 143-175
    6. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 209-240
    7. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 241-269
  4. On Assessing a Patient

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 271-271
    2. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 273-291
    3. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 293-308
    4. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 309-316
    5. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 317-331
  5. On Managing a Patient

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 333-333
    2. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 335-338
    3. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 339-345
    4. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 347-363
    5. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 365-383
    6. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 385-399
    7. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 401-418
    8. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 419-435
    9. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 437-443
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 445-457

About this book

Introduction

The old-fashioned doctor, whose departure from the modern medical scene is so greatly lamented, was amply aware of each patient's per­ sonality, family, work, and way of life. Today, we often blame a doctor's absence of that awareness on moral or ethical deficiency either in medical education or in the character of people who become physicians. An alternative explanation, however, is that doctors are just as moral, ethical, and concerned as ever before, but that a vast amount of additional new information has won the competition for attention. The data available to the old-fashioned doctor were a patient's history, phys­ ical examination, and "personal profile," together with a limited number of generally ineffectual therapeutic agents. A doctor today deals with an enormous array of additional new information, which comes from X-rays, biopsies, cytology, electrographic tracings, and the phantas­ magoria of contemporary laboratory tests, and the doctor must also be aware of a list of therapeutic possibilities that are both far more effective and far more extensive than ever before.

Keywords

Alzheimer's disease attention brain dementia diagnosis epidemiology health memory neurophysiology pathophysiology personality pharmacology schizophrenia stress suicide

Authors and affiliations

  • Hoyle Leigh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Morton F. Reiser
    • 3
  1. 1.Yale University School of MedicineYale-New Haven HospitalNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison and Outpatient ServicesYale-New Haven HospitalNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

Bibliographic information