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Legal Aspects of Geology

  • Ronald W. Tank

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Introduction to Basic Legal Concepts

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 3-16
    3. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 17-22
    4. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 23-27
    5. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 29-53
    6. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 71-74
  3. Water Rights Law

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 75-75
    2. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 77-102
    3. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 103-189
    4. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 191-206
    5. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 207-273
    6. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 275-280
  4. Mineral Law

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 281-281
    2. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 283-293
    3. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 295-302
    4. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 303-324
    5. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 325-334
    6. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 335-367
    7. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 369-419
    8. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 421-434
    9. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 435-449
    10. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 451-466
    11. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 467-478
  5. Surficial Processes

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 479-479
    2. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 481-526
    3. Ronald W. Tank
      Pages 527-562
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 563-583

About this book

Introduction

This treatise is an outgrowth of a series of seminars and tutorials on selected legal aspects of geology that were offered to several generations of undergraduate students at Lawrence University. The offerings were in response to a keen interest in how the law and legal institutions relate to the professional geologist. Much of the student interest was undoubtedly sparked by the legal controversies as­ sociated with the "environmental movement" that became so active during the 1970s and continues today to look to the law for the resolution of conflicting goals. Other students were interested in the role allocated to law by society in general, or were simply curious about law as a profession. Existing published material did not meet my needs, and I had to rely on "handouts" summarizing legal principles, reported appellate cases, and guest lectures from the county bar association. The more formally prepared course materials were edited by practicing attorneys and scholars in academia who encouraged me to seek a publisher who might make the materials available to a broader audience-an audience that might include not only students of the law but also the professional geologist, geological engineers, planners, policy­ makers, and attorneys, whether in industry, government, education, or private practice, who want to know more about the relationship between law and geology.

Keywords

education environment environmental movement geology growth

Authors and affiliations

  • Ronald W. Tank
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence UniversityAppletonUSA

Bibliographic information