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Radioecological Techniques

  • Vincent Schultz
  • F. Ward Whicker

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 1-5
  3. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 7-10
  4. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 11-16
  5. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 17-30
  6. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 31-55
  7. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 57-95
  8. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 97-113
  9. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 115-129
  10. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 131-134
  11. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 135-216
  12. Vincent Schultz, F. Ward Whicker
    Pages 217-258
  13. Back Matter
    Pages 259-298

About this book

Introduction

During the twenty years the authors have been associated with the field of radiation ecology, there has been a diversified and increasing use of radionuclides in applied and basic biological research. Prior to the advent of the atomic age in the 1940s the use of radionuclides as tracers was initiated, and following that period one observed a dramatically increased use in many disciplines. Concurrent with this increase there appeared many books and articles on radionuclide tech­ niques useful to biologists in general. Although only a few ecological applications were evident in these early years, ecologists were quick to see the opportunities available in their field. In the United States, major centers for such activities included Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U. S. Atomic Energy Com­ mission's Savannah River Plant. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory Dr. Stanley I. Auerbach, director of ecological activities, encouraged with remarkable suc­ cess the use of tracers by his associates. Dr. Eugene P. Odum had the foresight to see that radionuclide tracers provided the means to solve many problems of interest to ecologists. Consequently, his research included some unique radio­ tracer applications at the Savannah River Plant. In addition he encouraged others involved in ecological activities at the Savannah River Plant to do likewise. Ecologists such as Dr. Robert C. Pendleton at the U. S. Atomic Energy Com­ mission's Hanford Works applied radionuclides in their research. To these early investigators and to those who followed we owe the oppportunity to write this book.

Keywords

Laboratory age energy radiation research

Authors and affiliations

  • Vincent Schultz
    • 1
  • F. Ward Whicker
    • 2
  1. 1.Washington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  2. 2.Colorado State UniversityFt. CollinsUSA

Bibliographic information