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Imagery

Its Many Dimensions and Applications

  • Joseph E. Shorr
  • Gail E. Sobel
  • Pennee Robin
  • Jack A. Connella

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Theoretical Aspects of Imagery

  3. Psycho-Imagination Therapy

  4. Movement Therapy and Art Therapy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 221-221
    2. Erma Dosamantes-Alperson
      Pages 223-236
    3. Rose A. Dendinger
      Pages 237-241
  5. Guided Imagery and Fantasy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 251-251
    2. Dennis T. Jaffe, David E. Bresler
      Pages 253-266
    3. Robert Rose
      Pages 281-289
  6. Clinical Perspectives and Reports

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 303-303
    2. Milton Wolpin
      Pages 305-312
    3. Michael L. Emmons
      Pages 321-342
    4. Russell Bader, Revel Miller
      Pages 349-355
    5. Virginia Johnson
      Pages 357-374
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 391-398

About this book

Introduction

Imagery--the miraculous quality that human beings use to re-evoke and reorganize perceptions--is no longer considered idio­ syncratic. It is an absolutely integral part of human development and motivation which gives substance to subjective meaning and realistic aostract thought. A necessary ingredient of the trans­ mission and development of human life, imagery must be understood and carefully studied to enhance our knowledge and our lives. The imaginations people have of one another and the imagina­ tion one has of oneself are composed of the stuff that we call imagery. To my way of thinking, there is waking imagery (consist­ ing of our stream of images while we are awake) and dream, or sleep imagery (consisting of all that goes on in our minds while asleep). Daydreaming, reverie, fantasy, hallucinations and unbidden images are forms of waking imagery. Dreams, nightmares, hypnogogic and hypnopompic images are all part of sleep imagery. To be aware of and to study the manifestations and complexity of waking imagery--which appears to function in an effortless, instantaneous and ubiquitous manner--is now considered a fit sub­ ject for study after a half century of denial. The interest in and study of imagery has been far more empha­ sized in Europe than in America. In Sweden, for example, all clinical training for psychologists includes major emphasis on the works of Hanscarl Leuner and my own work in imagery.

Editors and affiliations

  • Joseph E. Shorr
    • 1
  • Gail E. Sobel
    • 1
  • Pennee Robin
    • 1
  • Jack A. Connella
    • 1
  1. 1.American Association of Mental ImageryLos AngelesUSA

Bibliographic information