The Patient

Biological, Psychological, and Social Dimensions of Medical Practice

  • Hoyle Leigh
  • Morton F. Reiser

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxvi
  2. On Becoming a Patient

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 3-14
    3. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 15-22
    4. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 23-35
  3. On Being a Patient

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 37-37
    2. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 39-69
    3. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 71-89
    4. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 91-127
    5. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 129-156
    6. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 157-182
  4. On Assessing a Patient

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 183-183
    2. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 201-217
    3. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 219-226
    4. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 227-240
  5. On Managing a Patient

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 241-241
    2. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 243-246
    3. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 247-252
    4. Hoyle Leigh, Morton F. Reiser
      Pages 253-269

About this book

Introduction

The old-fashioned doctor, whose departure from the modem medical scene is so greatly lamented, was amply aware of each patient's personality, family, work, and way of life. Today, we often blame a doctor's absence of that awareness on moral or ethical deficiency either in medical education or in the character of people who become physicians. An alternative explanation, however, is that doctors are just as moral, ethical, and concerned as ever before, but that a vast amount of additional new information has won the competition for attention. The data available to the old-fashioned doctor were a patient's history, physical examination, and "per­ sonal profile," together with a limited number of generally ineffectual therapeu­ tic agents. A doctor today deals with an enormous array of additional new information, which comes from X rays, biopsies, cytology, electrographic tracings, and the phantasmagoria of contemporary laboratory tests; and the doctor must also be aware of a list of therapeutic possibilities that are both far more effective and far more extensive than ever before.

Keywords

Syndrom Tranquilizer attention brain depression diagnosis emotion learning theory memory neurophysiology pharmacology physiology psychotherapy stress syndromes

Authors and affiliations

  • Hoyle Leigh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Morton F. Reiser
    • 3
  1. 1.Yale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison and Outpatient ServicesYale-New Haven HospitalNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-3527-6
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1980
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-3529-0
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-3527-6
  • About this book