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Normal Renal Function

The Excretion of Water, Urea and Electrolytes Derived from Food and Drink

  • W. J. O’Connor

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. Introduction

    1. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 1-10
  3. Acute Experiments on Normal Renal Function

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 11-11
    2. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 13-45
    3. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 47-53
    4. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 55-75
    5. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 77-85
    6. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 87-96
    7. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 97-110
    8. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 111-144
    9. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 163-178
    10. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 209-228
    11. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 229-246
  4. Balance Experiments

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 247-247
    2. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 249-264
    3. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 265-272
    4. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 273-281
    5. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 283-297
    6. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 299-328
    7. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 329-333
    8. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 335-347
    9. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 349-374
    10. W. J. O’Connor
      Pages 375-386
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 387-433

About this book

Introduction

This book has developed from an earlier monograph, 'Renal Function' (1962; London, Edward Arnold). It retains the general purpose of that book in relating the composition of the blood to the volume and com­ position of the urine of animals, including the new data of the intervening 20 years. As indicated by its title, this new book also has the particular purpose of studying the urine of animals in a normal environment and eating food usual to the species. Renal physiology illustrates a dilemma which arises also in other fields. Advanced technology, harnessed by accumulated experimental skill, now allows detailed investigation of basal processes. Micropuncture experiments have greatly advanced our understanding of the processes of glomerular fil­ tration and tubular reabsorption and have contribut­ ed to the wider discussion of the physicochemical nature of the movement of water and ions across cell surfaces. But experiments at microscopic or cell­ ular level demand experimental conditions in which the systems are abstracted from their natural en­ vironment, either as isolated perfused preparations or with the anaesthetised animal merely providing support for a tissue left in situ. The arguments from such experiments, important though they are towards understanding the basal processes, readily become remote from the reality of the normal animal.

Keywords

absorption blood cell physiology tissue water

Authors and affiliations

  • W. J. O’Connor
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeedsUK

Bibliographic information