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Clinical Behavior Therapy with Children

  • Thomas H. Ollendick
  • Jerome A. Cerny

Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 1-24
  3. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 25-56
  4. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 57-83
  5. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 84-115
  6. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 116-148
  7. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 149-177
  8. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 178-218
  9. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 219-250
  10. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 251-276
  11. Thomas H. Ollendick, Jerome A. Cerny
    Pages 277-303
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 304-351

About this book

Introduction

As noted by its title, the focus of this book is centered on an examination of behavior therapy with children in clinical settings. Throughout, our goal has been to examine theoretical underpinnings, review empirical research, and illustrate clinical utility for a variety of behavioral proce­ dures with children. In pursuing this goal, we have described child behavior therapy as an approach based on empirical methodology, de­ rived from behavioral principles, and focused upon adjustment disor­ ders of children. The hallmark of such an approach is its accountability­ the extent to which the procedures and techniques presented in this text are demonstrably accountable must be determined at least partially by the reader. As students of child behavior, we have become sensitized to two trends in behavior therapy with children during the preparation of this book. First, we have been concerned with the simple application of behavioral procedures to children, irrespective of developmental con­ siderations. All too frequently, assessment strategies and treatment pro­ cedures found to be useful with adults have been applied to children in an indiscriminate fashion. For example, some recent studies have examined and assessed the very same social skill deficits in children as in adults (e. g. , lack of eye contact, delayed latency of response, and absence of positive commendatory responses). Surely, skill deficits differ from age to age just as they differ from situation to situation.

Keywords

Biofeedback Prompting Training age assessment behavior child children development learning theory management research social learning therapy treatment

Authors and affiliations

  • Thomas H. Ollendick
    • 1
  • Jerome A. Cerny
    • 2
  1. 1.Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  2. 2.Indiana State UniversityTerre HauteUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-1104-1
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1981
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-1106-5
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-1104-1
  • Series Print ISSN 1566-7820
  • Buy this book on publisher's site