Physics for Computer Science Students

With Emphasis on Atomic and Semiconductor Physics

  • Narciso Garcia
  • Arthur Damask

Part of the Springer Study Edition book series (SSE)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 1-8
  3. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 9-19
  4. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 21-36
  5. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 37-52
  6. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 53-65
  7. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 67-80
  8. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 81-95
  9. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 97-110
  10. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 111-130
  11. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 131-144
  12. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 145-155
  13. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 157-176
  14. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 177-186
  15. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 187-202
  16. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 203-226
  17. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 227-241
  18. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 243-262
  19. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 263-278
  20. Narciso Garcia, Arthur Damask
    Pages 279-296

About this book

Introduction

This text is the product of several years' effort to develop a course to fill a specific educational gap. It is our belief that computer science students should know how a computer works, particularly in light of rapidly changing tech­ nologies. The text was designed for computer science students who have a calculus background but have not necessarily taken prior physics courses. However, it is clearly not limited to these students. Anyone who has had first-year physics can start with Chapter 17. This includes all science and engineering students who would like a survey course of the ideas, theories, and experiments that made our modern electronics age possible. This textbook is meant to be used in a two-semester sequence. Chapters 1 through 16 can be covered during the first semester, and Chapters 17 through 28 in the second semester. At Queens College, where preliminary drafts have been used, the material is presented in three lecture periods (50 minutes each) and one recitation period per week, 15 weeks per semester. The lecture and recitation are complemented by a two-hour laboratory period per week for the first semester and a two-hour laboratory period biweekly for the second semester.

Keywords

Standard circuit computer computer science education logic mechanics physics programming quantum mechanics semiconductor devices

Authors and affiliations

  • Narciso Garcia
    • 1
  • Arthur Damask
    • 1
  1. 1.Physics DepartmentQueen’s College of the City University of New YorkFlushingUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-0421-0
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1991
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-387-97656-3
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-0421-0
  • Series Print ISSN 0172-6234
  • About this book