An Encyclopedia of Quotations About Music

  • Editors
  • Nat Shapiro
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Music is ... Music Does ... Music Means ...

  3. Creators and Components

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 31-31
    2. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 33-40
    3. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 41-66
    4. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 67-72
  4. Exponents

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 73-73
    2. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 75-80
    3. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 81-94
    4. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 95-101
    5. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 102-106
    6. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 107-109
    7. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 110-111
    8. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 112-113
    9. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 114-119
  5. Proponents and Opponents

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 121-121
    2. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 123-127
    3. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 128-141
  6. Lift Every Voice

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 143-143
    2. Nat Shapiro
      Pages 145-153

About this book

Introduction

Writing about music-about what it is and what it means-is akin to describing the act of love. Somehow, the reduction of the experience to an unblushingly detailed exposition of how, where, when, and why who does what to whom, from prelude to resolu­ tion, loses everything in the translation. The other extreme, the one wherein the writer, in desperation, resorts to metaphor (with or without benefit of meter and rhyme), most often results in im­ agery that is banal, vulgar, inane, obscure, pretentious, and almost always insufferably romantic. To achieve good and accurate writing about music is as rare an accomplishment as expert wine-tasting, lion-taming, diamond-cut­ ting, truffie-finding and (if one just happens to be an unconverted Mohican brave) deer-tracking. Only the intuitive, the pure, the sensual, and the intrepid need apply. Professional musicians often evidence a fixed tendency either to rudely ignore or else to actively despise those of us who bravely try to understand, define, and describe their art. To many composers and instrumentalists, those outsiders (nonmusicians) who have the temerity to discuss anything more abstract than the digital dexterity of a fiddler, the particular vanity of a conductor, or the wage scales for overtime recording sessions are judged worthy only of contempt or-at the most-patronizing tolerance. "Music means itself," insists one of the contributors to the collection that follows, and many practitioners of the art of organ­ ized sound would prefer to leave it at that.

Keywords

Cora Diamond art conductor encyclopedia experience love music organ recording reduction sound tolerance translation writing

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-9627-1
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1977
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4615-9629-5
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-9627-1
  • About this book