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Environment and Utopia

A Synthesis

  • Rudolf Moos
  • Robert Brownstein

Part of the The Plenum Social Ecology Series book series (PSES)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Conceptual and Philosophical Background

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 3-21
    3. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 23-54
  3. Case Studies of Optimal Communities

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 55-55
    2. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 57-91
    3. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 93-125
    4. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 127-161
    5. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 163-195
  4. A Synthesis of Environmental and Utopian Perspectives

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 197-197
    2. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 199-236
    3. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 237-265
    4. Rudolf Moos, Robert Brownstein
      Pages 267-278
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 279-284

About this book

Introduction

to imagine and innovate with our ability to comprehend and manipulate natural and social forces. We must produce constructive contact between our visions of hope and our scientific knowledge of the physical and social environment. This work is an effort to further that contact. We seek to focus upon the future relationship between man and his environment. Specifically, we attempt to synthesize two distinct approaches to this issue: environmental theory and utopian speculation. These two perspectives have rarely, if ever, been deliberately focused upon one an­ other. We believe that each suggests new questions and hopefully new an­ swers that would not normally be revealed through the separate insights of the other discipline. Both perspectives have existed in one form or another for centuries. Yet today, there is an increased urgency for their mutual development and interaction. This century, to its loss, has tended to abandon utopian specu­ lation. We witness "a retreat from constructive thinking about the future in order to dig oneself into the trenches of the present. It is a ruthless elim­ ination of future-centered idealism by today-centered realism. We have lost the ability to see any further than the end of our collective nose. " 2 At the same time, contemporary research on the environment suggests an urgent need for change in basic patterns of human behavior, for the for­ mation of new institutions and social structure.

Keywords

Motivation behavior climate complexity development ecology ecosystem environment forest growth iron lake organizations structure

Authors and affiliations

  • Rudolf Moos
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert Brownstein
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Administration HospitalPalo AltoUSA

Bibliographic information