Psychology

A Behavioral Overview

  • Alan Poling
  • Henry Schlinger
  • Stephen Starin
  • Elbert Blakely

Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 1-20
  3. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 21-46
  4. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 47-68
  5. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 69-95
  6. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 97-126
  7. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 127-156
  8. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 157-182
  9. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 183-223
  10. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 225-255
  11. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 257-280
  12. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 281-326
  13. Alan Poling, Henry Schlinger, Stephen Starin, Elbert Blakely
    Pages 327-355
  14. Back Matter
    Pages 357-395

About this book

Introduction

Psychology: A Behavioral Overview is an introductory text with an orienting per­ spective that is frankly behavioral rather than eclectic. This focus is made quite clear in the first chapter of the book, but in the remainder it also becomes clear that such a focus permits coverage of most of the topics found in the more common introductory text. Actually, the next five chapters (dealing with psy­ chology as a scienc~, methodology, evolution, physiology, and learning) are in many ways comparable to the treatments provided in more eclectic introductory texts. The behavioral focus and the departure from traditional approaches be­ come most significant in the last six chapters which deal with traditional psycho­ logical topics (e. g. , language, child development, and personality)-but deal with them systematically in terms of the concepts and principles introduced in the chapters on evolution and physiology, and especially in the chapter on learning. Using the concepts provided early in the text to interpret complex aspects of human behavior provides valuable justification for those concepts, as well as an opportunity for improved understanding of them. Although students will not make extensive contact with the variety of the­ oretical approaches found in the typical text, they will become especially compe­ tent in the use of behavioral concepts and principles to interpret and understand many of the topics of traditional importance in psychology.

Keywords

Anorexia nervosa Chaining Experimental Design Verbal Behavior anxiety disorder behavior behavior analysis evaluation experiment naturalistic observation psychology reinforcement reinforcer research methods stress

Authors and affiliations

  • Alan Poling
    • 1
  • Henry Schlinger
    • 2
  • Stephen Starin
    • 3
  • Elbert Blakely
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA
  2. 2.Western New England CollegeSpringfieldUSA
  3. 3.Health and Rehabilitative ServicesDevelopmental Services Program OfficeMiamiUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7694-5
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1990
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4615-7696-9
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-7694-5
  • Series Print ISSN 0258-1221
  • About this book