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Hearing and Sound Communication in Fishes

  • William N. Tavolga
  • Arthur N. Popper
  • Richard R. Fay

Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Form and Function

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Christopher Platt, Arthur N. Popper
      Pages 3-38
    3. J. H. S. Blaxter, E. J. Denton, J. A. B. Gray
      Pages 39-59
    4. J. H. S. Blaxter
      Pages 61-71
    5. David B. Jenkins
      Pages 73-79
    6. Jeffrey T. Corwin
      Pages 81-105
  3. Auditory Capabilities and Psychophysics

  4. Physiological Mechanisms of the Ear

  5. Sound Source Localization

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 265-265
    2. Arie Schuijf
      Pages 267-310
  6. Central Nervous System

  7. Sound Production and Acoustical Behavior

  8. Lateral Line System

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 457-457
    2. Olav Sand
      Pages 459-480
    3. D. Strelioff, W. G. Sokolich
      Pages 481-505
  9. Prospectives

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 523-523
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 589-608

About these proceedings

Introduction

This volume is a compilation of the papers presented at a meeting that took place in April 1980 at the Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, Florida. The meeting and this volume are outgrowths of two earlier international meetings on marine bio-acoustics that occurred in 1963 and 1966 (Tavolga 1964, 1967). The first meeting took place at the Lerner Marine Laboratory of the American Museum of Natural History, while the second meeting was at the American Museum itself, and was under the sponsorship of the Department of Animal Behavior. It is apparent that these two volumes have had immense impact on the current study of marine bio-acoustics, and particularly on fish audition. In a preliminary conference in Sarasota in 1979 we decided that it was time for another such meeting, to bring together as many as possible of the investigators interested in fish acoustics in order to assess the current state of our knowledge and predict directions for research for the next several years. Such a meeting appeared par­ ticularly timely, since over the past four or five years there have been many new studies that have provided new empirical and theoretical work on basic mechanisms of fish audition. Furthermore, it became evident, as we made up preliminary lists of possible participants, that few of the currently active workers were in the field back in 1966. In fact, of the current participants, only Drs.

Keywords

Fische Fishes Hören Lautäusserung Popper Seitenlinienorgan nervous system neurons

Editors and affiliations

  • William N. Tavolga
    • 1
  • Arthur N. Popper
    • 2
  • Richard R. Fay
    • 3
  1. 1.Mote Marine LaboratorySarasotaUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyGeorgetown University, Schools of Medicine and DentistryUSA
  3. 3.Parmly Hearing Institute and Department of PsychologyLoyola University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7186-5
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1981
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4615-7188-9
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-7186-5
  • Series Print ISSN 0172-6625
  • Buy this book on publisher's site