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An Atlas of Mammalian Chromosomes

Volume 2

  • T. C. Hsu
  • Kurt Benirschke

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxiii
  2. Marsupialia

    1. Didelphidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 1-3
  3. Insectivora

    1. Erinaceidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 5-7
      2. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 9-11
    2. Talpidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 13-15
  4. Chiroptera

    1. Phyllostomidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 17-19
    2. Vespertilionidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 21-23
      2. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 25-27
  5. Rodentia

    1. Heteromyidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 29-31
    2. Castoridae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 33-35
    3. Cricetidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 37-39
      2. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 41-43
      3. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 45-47
      4. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 49-51
      5. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 53-55
      6. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 57-59
      7. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 61-63
      8. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 65-67
      9. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 69-71
      10. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 73-75
      11. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 77-79
    4. Muridae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 81-83
    5. Erethizontidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 85-87
    6. Caviidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 89-91
    7. Dasyproctidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 93-95
      2. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 97-99
    8. Capromyidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 101-103
  6. Carnivora

    1. Procyonidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 105-107
    2. Hyaenidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 109-111
    3. Mustelidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 113-115
      2. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 117-119
      3. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 121-123
    4. Felidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 125-127
      2. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 129-131
      3. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 133-135
      4. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 137-139
  7. Artiodactyla

    1. Cervidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 141-143
      2. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 145-147
      3. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 149-151
    2. Bovidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 153-155
      2. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 157-159
      3. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 161-163
      4. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 165-167
      5. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 169-171
      6. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 173-175
      7. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 177-179
      8. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 181-183
  8. Primates

    1. Tupaiidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 185-187
    2. Cebidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 189-191
    3. Callithricidae

      1. T. C. Hsu, Kurt Benirschke
        Pages 193-195

About this book

Introduction

In recent years, because of advances in karyological techniques, we have witnessed a remarkable renewal of interest in studies of mammalian chromosomes. These techniques, generally involving the use of tissue culture, colchicine and hypotonic solution pretreatments, allow for a much clearer display of metaphase chromosomes of mammalian cells than the classic direct squash or tissue section methods. Consequently, what was known about the chromosome complement of most mammals must be revised. The most astonishing revision, of course, was that made by Tjio and Levan in 1956, who demonstrated that the diploid number of man is 46, not 48 as previously believed. Similar revisions will have to be made for many other mammalian species, either in number or in karyotype structure. Many animals are being examined cytologically for the first time. The findings are now extensive and scattered; they appear in numer­ ous periodicals and newsletters, or they are kept in cytologists' file drawers without being published. It is difficult to have access to perti­ nent data for comparison among related species or for evaluation of various karyological characteristics within a karyotype. Such evaluations can be done only when reasonably uniform material is collected and placed side by side for comparison, accompanied by relative references. We considered that probably an Atlas of Mammalian Chromosomes would fulfill such a need. Needless to say, it is impossible to present karyotypes of all mam­ malian species at one time.

Keywords

animals chromosome mammals tissue

Authors and affiliations

  • T. C. Hsu
    • 1
  • Kurt Benirschke
    • 2
  1. 1.Section of Cytology, Department of BiologyThe University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor InstituteHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyDartmouth Medical SchoolHanoverUSA

Bibliographic information