Bringing Scanning Probe Microscopy up to Speed

  • S. C. Minne
  • S. R. Manalis
  • C. F. Quate

Part of the Microsystems book series (MICT, volume 3)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 15-22
  3. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 23-48
  4. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 49-80
  5. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 81-98
  6. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 99-118
  7. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 119-130
  8. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 131-140
  9. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 141-157
  10. S. C. Minne, S. R. Manalis, C. F. Quate
    Pages 159-167
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 169-173

About this book

Introduction

Bringing Scanning Probe Microscopy Up to Speed introduces the principles of scanning probe systems with particular emphasis on techniques for increasing speed. The authors include useful information on the characteristics and limitations of current state-of-the-art machines as well as the properties of the systems that will follow in the future. The basic approach is two-fold. First, fast scanning systems for single probes are treated and, second, systems with multiple probes operating in parallel are presented.
The key components of the SPM are the mechanical microcantilever with integrated tip and the systems used to measure its deflection. In essence, the entire apparatus is devoted to moving the tip over a surface with a well-controlled force. The mechanical response of the actuator that governs the force is of the utmost importance since it determines the scanning speed. The mechanical response relates directly to the size of the actuator; smaller is faster. Traditional scanning probe microscopes rely on piezoelectric tubes of centimeter size to move the probe. In future scanning probe systems, the large actuators will be replaced with cantilevers where the actuators are integrated on the beam. These will be combined in arrays of multiple cantilevers with MEMS as the key technology for the fabrication process.

Keywords

Helium-Atom-Streuung Sensor microelectromechanical system (MEMS) microscopy silicon surface

Authors and affiliations

  • S. C. Minne
    • 1
  • S. R. Manalis
    • 2
  • C. F. Quate
    • 3
  1. 1.Nanodevices, Inc.USA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyUSA
  3. 3.Stanford UniversityUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-5167-6
  • Copyright Information Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-7353-7
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-5167-6
  • Series Print ISSN 1389-2134
  • About this book