Advances in Nutrition and Cancer

  • Vincenzo Zappia
  • Marco Salvatore
  • Fulvio Della Ragione

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 348)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-4
  2. Molecular Bases of Malignant Transformation

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 5-5
    2. Stuart A. Aaronson, Toru Miki, Kimberly Meyers, Andrew Chan
      Pages 7-22
    3. Fulvio Della Ragione, Adriana Oliva, Rosanna Palumbo, Gian Luigi Russo, Vincenzo Zappia
      Pages 31-43
    4. Pasquale Barba, Maria Cristina Magli, Claudia Tiberio, Clemente Cillo
      Pages 45-57
    5. Giovanni Santelli, Vittorio de Franciscis, Gennaro Chiappetta, Amelia D’Alessio, Daniela Califano, Alba Mineo et al.
      Pages 59-62
  3. Epidemiological Studies: Risk Factors and Diet

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 63-63
    2. Flaminio Fidanza
      Pages 65-67
    3. Michael J. Hill
      Pages 69-74
    4. Salvatore Panico, Egidio Celentano, Rocco Galasso, Eduardo Farinaro, Camilla Ambrosca, Rossano Dello Iacovo
      Pages 75-83
    5. Attilio Giacosa, Rosangela Filiberti, Paola Visconti, Michael J. Hill, Franco Berrino, Amleto D’Amicis
      Pages 85-97
    6. Gabriele Riccardi, Anna V. Ciardullo
      Pages 99-104
  4. Clinical Research and Perspectives

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 105-105
    2. Jean Faivre, Marie-Christine Boutron, Valerie Quipourt
      Pages 107-118
    3. Frits de Waard
      Pages 119-122
    4. Peter I. Reed
      Pages 123-132
    5. Gabriele Mazzacca
      Pages 133-136
    6. Anna Ferro-Luzzi, Andrea Ghiselli
      Pages 137-144
    7. Giuseppe Catalano, Michele Della Vittoria Scarpati, Ferdinando De Vita, Pasquale Federico, Giuseppina Guarino, Andrea Perrelli et al.
      Pages 145-148

About this book

Introduction

This volume contains the scientific contributions presented at the International Symposium held in Naples, Italy, in November 1992 at the National Tumor Institute "Fondazione Pascale". The Meeting gathered together experts from different disciplines, all involved in the vital and timely subject of Nutrition and Cancer. About 15 years ago a consensus among cancer epidemiologists began to emerge suggesting that diet might be responsible for 30-60% of the cancers in the developed world. The best estimate, reported in a now classical paper by Richard Doll and Richard Peto (1981), was that by dietary modification, it would be possible to reduce fatal cancers by about 35%. Within about six years there was widespread agreement that the principal changes required were a reduction in consumption of fat, along with an increase in the consumption of fruit, green and yellow vegetables, dietary fiber, and some micronutrients. Attention was also paid to the methods of cooking and preservation of foodstuffs. On the other hand very few, if any, effects were attributed to food additives and to pollution of food by trace pesticides, to which the general public often gives unfounded importance.

Keywords

additives cancer dietary fiber enzymes gene expression nutrition pesticides prevention transcription

Editors and affiliations

  • Vincenzo Zappia
    • 1
  • Marco Salvatore
    • 2
  • Fulvio Della Ragione
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biochemistry of Macromolecules Medical SchoolSecond University of NaplesNaplesItaly
  2. 2.Fondazione “Giovanni Pascale”National Cancer InstituteNaplesItaly

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2942-2
  • Copyright Information Plenum Press, New York 1993
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-6278-4
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-2942-2
  • Series Print ISSN 0065-2598
  • About this book