A Handbook of Food Packaging

  • Frank A. Paine
  • Heather Y. Paine

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiv
  2. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 1-32
  3. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 33-52
  4. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 53-96
  5. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 97-166
  6. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 167-186
  7. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 187-204
  8. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 205-230
  9. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 231-247
  10. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 248-264
  11. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 265-295
  12. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 296-314
  13. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 315-334
  14. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 335-346
  15. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 347-356
  16. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 357-389
  17. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 390-425
  18. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 426-463
  19. Frank A. Paine, Heather Y. Paine
    Pages 464-476
  20. Back Matter
    Pages 477-497

About this book

Introduction

This is the second edition of a successful title first published in 1983 and now therefore a decade out of date. The authors consider the development of the right package for a particular food in a particular market, from the point of view of the food technologist, the packaging engineer and those concerned with marketing. While the original format has been retained, the contents have been thoroughly revised to take account of the considerable advances made in recent years in the techniques of food processing, packaging and distribution. While efficient packaging is even more a necessity for every kind of food, whether fresh or processed, and is an essential link between the food producer and the consumer, the emphasis on its several functions has changed. Its basic function is to identify the product and ensure that it travels safely through the distribution system to the consumer. Packaging designed and constructed solely for this purpose adds little or nothing to the value of the product, merely preserving farm or processor freshness or preventing physical damage, and cost effectiveness is the sole criterion for success. If, however, the packaging facilitates the use of the product, is reusable or has an after-use, some extra value can be added to justify the extra cost and promote sales. Many examples of packaging providing such extra value can be cited over the last decade.

Keywords

Food Packaging Packaging Packaging Materials food processing processing transport

Authors and affiliations

  • Frank A. Paine
    • 1
    • 2
  • Heather Y. Paine
  1. 1.International Association of Packaging Research InstitutesBelgium
  2. 2.School of PackagingMichigan State UniversityUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2810-4
  • Copyright Information Chapman & Hall 1992
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-6214-2
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-2810-4
  • About this book