Frequency Measurement and Control

  • Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research

Part of the Microwave Technology Series book series (MRFT, volume 7)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 1-30
  3. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 31-69
  4. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 70-100
  5. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 101-152
  6. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 153-214
  7. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 215-271
  8. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 272-300
  9. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 301-307
  10. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 308-321
  11. Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    Pages 322-335
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 337-340

About this book

Introduction

Periodical phenomena or, more precisely, quasiperiodical phenomena, occupy a central position in physics. For a long time, their most important parameter has been their period. However, nowadays, we are much more interested in their frequency, and the many reasons for this are discussed in this book. Throughout history, evaluations of time have been based on periodical phenomena such as the apparent motion of the Sun. Indeed, the oldest unit of time is the day. The apparent motion of the Moon and of the celestial sphere, including changes in the appearance of the former, provided longer units, namely, week, month and year. All these periodical phenomen- the natural clocks - were obviously well suited to the observation and prediction of the evolution of nature with its seasonal rhythm. The gnomon and the clepsydra gave reasonably precise subdivisions of the day that could be used in timing human activities, so long as they were mostly agricultural. The invention of the pendulum and of balanceĀ­ wheel clocks marked the dawn of industrial civilisation, which soon deĀ­ manded measurements of time with ever increasing precision over shorter and shorter periods.

Keywords

electronics microwave optoelectronics physics remote sensing

Authors and affiliations

  • Chronos Group, French National Observatory, and National Centre of Scientific Research
    • 1
  1. 1.France

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-2502-8
  • Copyright Information Chapman & Hall 1994
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-6065-0
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-2502-8
  • About this book