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Cross-Sectional Anatomy for Computed Tomography

A Self-Study Guide with Selected Sections from Head, Neck, Thorax, Abdomen, and Pelvis

  • Michael L. Farkas

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Michael L. Farkas
    Pages 1-1
  3. Michael L. Farkas
    Pages 3-9
  4. Back Matter
    Pages 77-84

About this book

Introduction

The clinical acceptance of computed anatomic cross-sections. Schematic line tomography (CT) as an integral part of our drawings are also generously used to il­ diagnostic armamentarium was based on its lustrate particularly complex anatomic re­ ability to display cross-sectional anatomy gions and help the reader obtain a correct with near anatomic precision. However, perspective on these more difficult regions. the radiologist must first be knowledgeable The book successfully presents a clear per­ of the complexities of normal anatomy be­ spective on the anatomy we see daily in fore he can truly make full use of this tech­ using cross-sectional imaging techniques. nology. This book will prove useful as a learning Michael Farkas has truly made our task guide for the uninitiated, and as a refer­ as radiologists easier. As noted in the ence for the more experienced. Either preface, the book carefully correlates rep­ way, it is an important contribution to our resentative CT slices with corresponding literature. Elliot K. Fishman, M.D.

Keywords

anatomy computed tomography computed tomography (CT) tomography

Editors and affiliations

  • Michael L. Farkas
    • 1
  1. 1.American Board of Plastic SurgeryBernSwitzerland

Bibliographic information