The Art of Planning

Selected Essays of Harvey S. Perloff

  • Leland S. Burns
  • John Friedmann

Part of the Environment, Development and Public Policy book series (EDPC)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiv
  2. Revitalizing Central Cities

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-3
    2. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 5-12
    3. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 13-28
    4. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 29-46
    5. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 47-62
  3. Urban and Metropolitan Planning and Policy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 63-66
    2. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 67-90
    3. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 91-104
    4. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 105-120
    5. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 121-136
  4. Regional Planning and Analysis

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 137-140
    2. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 141-149
    3. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 159-165
    4. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 166-185
    5. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 186-204
    6. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 205-219
  5. Fiscal Policy and Planning

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 221-222
    2. Leland S. Burns, John Friedmann
      Pages 223-240

About this book

Introduction

The work of Harvey S. Perloff stands as a landmark in the evolution of Anglo­ American planning doctrine. It is impossible to fully capture the essence of the published work in a paragraph, page, or even an entire essay. Yet its highpoints can be identified. His work was innovative, reformist, comprehensive, and ori­ ented toward the future. In emphasizing the greater importance of people com­ pared to things, Perloff repeatedly prodded planners to be concerned with human needs and values. He was critical of the past. But inasmuch as he de­ voted more effort to envisioning what could lie ahead than in recalling the past, his work was markedly optimistic. He once admitted in writing to his "built-in weakness for expecting rational, socially oriented solutions ultimately to win out, no matter what the objective situation seems to be. " To some the expecta­ tion may be seen as naive; to others, as a faith in the wisdom of humankind to take the best course. However received, Perloff's optimism served as a powerful stimulant to keep moving ahead for the best that would come of it. Institutions and the ways they should be shaped and reshaped were of central concern, for institutions (though he rarely used the term) were the in­ struments through which "knowledge was translated into action.

Keywords

Evolution Import Institution Nation education environment knowledge

Editors and affiliations

  • Leland S. Burns
    • 1
  • John Friedmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Architecture and Urban PlanningUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-2505-5
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1985
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-9515-0
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4613-2505-5
  • About this book