The Foundations of Laboratory Safety

A Guide for the Biomedical Laboratory

  • Stephen R. Rayburn

Part of the Brock/Springer Series in Contemporary Bioscience book series (BROCK/SPRINGER)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Introduction

    1. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 1-5
  3. Basic Principles of Laboratory Safety

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 7-7
    2. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 9-24
    3. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 25-35
    4. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 36-38
    5. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 39-43
    6. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 44-65
  4. Laboratory Facilities, Operations, and Practices

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 67-67
    2. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 69-72
    3. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 73-81
    4. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 82-88
    5. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 89-101
    6. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 102-109
  5. Biomedical Laboratory Safety

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 111-111
    2. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 113-139
    3. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 140-180
    4. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 181-218
  6. Control of Common Hazards

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 219-219
    2. Stephen R. Rayburn
      Pages 221-227

About this book

Introduction

Safety is a word that has many connotations, of risk ofa possible accident that is acceptable conjuring up different meanings to different to one person· may not be acceptable to an­ people. What is safety? A scientist views safety other. This may be one reason why skydiving as a consideration in the design of an exper­ and mountain climbing are sports that are not iment. A manufacturing plant engineer looks as popular as are, say, boating or skiing. on safety as one of the necessary factors in But even activities that have high levels of developing a manufacturing process. A legis­ potential risk can be engaged in safely. How lator is likely to see safety as an important part can we minimize risks so that they decrease of an environmental law. A governmental ad­ to acceptable levels? We can do this by iden­ ministrator may consider various safety issues tifying sources of hazards and by assessing the when reviewing the environmental conse­ risks of accidents inherent to these hazards. quences of a proposed project. An attorney Most hazards that are faced in the laboratory may base a negligence suit on safety defects.

Keywords

Biomedical Laboratory DNA Laboratory Laboratory Techniques Viruses

Authors and affiliations

  • Stephen R. Rayburn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-3320-6
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1990
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-7965-5
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4612-3320-6
  • Series Print ISSN 1432-0061
  • About this book