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Remote Sensing of Biosphere Functioning

  • R. J. Hobbs
  • Harold A. Mooney

Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 79)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Harold A. Mooney, Richard J. Hobbs
    Pages 1-4
  3. John D. Aber, Carol A. Wessman, David L. Peterson, Jerry M. Melillo, James H. Fownes
    Pages 87-103
  4. Robert E. Dickinson
    Pages 105-133
  5. Carol A. Wessman
    Pages 135-156
  6. Pamela A. Matson, Peter M. Vitousek
    Pages 157-167
  7. Piers J. Sellers, F. G. Hall, D. E. Strebel, G. Asrar, R. E. Murphy
    Pages 169-201
  8. Geoff Pickup
    Pages 221-247
  9. John S. Parslow, Graham P. Harris
    Pages 269-290
  10. Jeremy F. Wallace, Norm Campbell
    Pages 291-304
  11. Richard J. Hobbs, Harold A. Mooney
    Pages 305-306
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 307-312

About this book

Introduction

Harold A. Mooney and Richard J. Hobbs At present there is enormous concern about the changes that are occurring on the surface of the earth and in the earth's atmosphere, primarily as a result of human activities. These changes, particularly in the atmosphere, have the potential for altering the earth's habitability. International pro­ grams unprecedented in scope, including the International Geosphere­ Biosphere Program, have been initiated to describe and understand these changes. The global change program will call for coordinated measure­ ments on a global scale of those interactive physical and biological pro­ cesses that regulate the earth system. The program will rely heavily on the emerging technology of remote sensing from airborne vehicles, particularly satellites. Satellites offer the potential of continuously viewing large seg­ ments of the earth's surface, thus documenting the changes that are occur­ ring. The task, however, is not only to document global change, which will be an enormous job, but also to understand the significance of these changes to the biosphere. Effects on the biosphere may cover all spatial scales from global to local. The possibility of measuring biosphere function remot~ly and continuously from satellite imagery must be explored quickly and thoroughly in order to meet the challenge of understanding the con­ sequences of global change. Initial guidelines and approaches are currently being formulated (Dyer and Crossley, 1986; JOI, 1984; NAS, 1986; Rasool, 1987). There are many conceptual and technical issues that must be resolved H. A. Mooney and R. J.

Keywords

Geoinformationssysteme biochemistry biogeochemical cycles biosphere chemistry decomposition ecosystem forest remote sensing satellite simulation temperature temporal dynamics terrestrial ecosystem vegetation

Editors and affiliations

  • R. J. Hobbs
    • 1
  • Harold A. Mooney
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Wildlife and EcologyCSIROMidlandAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-3302-2
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1990
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-7958-7
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4612-3302-2
  • Series Print ISSN 0070-8356
  • Buy this book on publisher's site