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The Rivers of Florida

  • Robert J. Livingston

Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 83)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Robert J. Livingston, Edward A. Fernald
    Pages 1-15
  3. Andre F. Clewell
    Pages 17-30
  4. Benjamin F. McPherson, K. M. Hammett
    Pages 31-46
  5. Andre F. Clewell
    Pages 47-63
  6. D. Gray Bass Jr.
    Pages 65-83
  7. Robert J. Livingston
    Pages 85-95
  8. Carole L. DeMort
    Pages 97-120
  9. James A. Kushlan
    Pages 121-142
  10. Ernest D. Estevez, L. Kellie Dixon, Michael S. Flannery
    Pages 187-221
  11. Robert J. Livingston, J. H. Epler, Frank Jordan Jr., William R. Karsteter, Christopher C. Koenig, A. K. S. K. Prasad et al.
    Pages 247-274
  12. Robert J. Livingston
    Pages 275-283
  13. Back Matter
    Pages 285-289

About this book

Introduction

This book addresses basic questions concerning the ecological relationships and current conditions of the major river systems in Florida . . There have been relatively few comprehensive studies made of the rivers of Florida. There is, to be sure, voluminous information that addresses various aspects of riverine ecology. However, little such information has been collected in a way that allows even a preliminary understanding of the driving forces that determine how the diverse freshwater and associated brackish systems function. This lack of useful data is the product of a fundamental ignorance concerning the scale of endeavor, both spatially and temporally, that is needed if we are to understand and, parenthetically, manage the major drainage systems of this area of the country (Livingston, 1987). Research used to address management problems should entail a continuous series of interrelated studies, descriptive and experimental, that answer the immediate (and often less important) questions that are asked on a day-to-day basis. The research should also be designed to answer questions that have not yet been asked. In other words, ecosystem research should be organized on an appropriate scale so that system-wide processes are understood and pr

Keywords

Contamination Drainage ecology ecosystem environment vegetation

Editors and affiliations

  • Robert J. Livingston
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Aquatic Research and Resource DevelopmentFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-3036-6
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1991
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-7771-2
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4612-3036-6
  • Series Print ISSN 0070-8356
  • Buy this book on publisher's site